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Psychology Explains How Cultural Differences Influence Human Behavior

Branches of psychology

The main difference between the cross-cultural psychology and the other branches of psychology refers to the fact that cross-cultural psychology analyses the effects of culture on human behavior, whereas the other types of psychology focus more on how people themselves influence the human behavior.

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Psychology Explains How Cultural Differences Influence Human Behavior

Psychology Explains How Cultural Differences Influence Human Behavior

https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is-cross-cultural-psychology-2794903

verywellmind.com

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Key Ideas

Cross-cultural psychology

Cross-cultural psychology is defined as a branch of psychology that analyses the effects of cultural factors on human behavior.

For instance, while some cultures play a great importance on individualism, others choose collectivism as being more important.

The importance of cross-cultural psychology

The first important role cross-cultural psychology has is to rectify most of the biases that people have in the field.

Furthermore, this branch of the psychology is used to understand the influence that cultural differences have on people's perception of each other.

The culture

The term 'culture' can be defined as the characteristics of a group of people, from attitudes to values, transmitted from generation to generation.

The cross-cultural psychology studies, by means of etic or emic approach, the way culture influences our life as a whole or the idea of ethnocentrism, which so often leads to biases.

Topics in cross-cultural pshycology

The main topics in cross-cultural psychology are the following:

  • Emotions
  • Language acquisition
  • Child development
  • Personality
  • Social behavior
  • Family and social relationships/

Branches of psychology

The main difference between the cross-cultural psychology and the other branches of psychology refers to the fact that cross-cultural psychology analyses the effects of culture on human behavior, whereas the other types of psychology focus more on how people themselves influence the human behavior.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Different Psychologies
Different Psychologies

Psychology, which was largely developed in North American and Europe, has largely been able to understand human behavior and mental processes.

As our knowledge of different cultures and thou...

The Right Representation

Normally, studies conducted to understand human behavior have participants representing the wider human population, which may be true in a certain geography but isn't accurate when we take into account other cultures and demographics.

More than 90% of the participants in psychological studies originate from countries that are Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich and Democratic (W.E.I.R.D) which is neither a random sample nor a real representation of the human population.

Different Ways Of Being

People across the world have different ways of describing themselves, different mental associations and thinking styles, possessing radically diverse motivations, upbringing, and social relationships.

What may be categorized as a mental illness in a certain part of the world may be normal behavior in another. Cultural differences pervade in a wider array of human behavior and there is a need to increase the circumference and scope of these studies.

Community Psychology
Community Psychology

It is a multidisciplinary subject of psychology that synthesizes elements from various disciplines like sociology, public health, social psychology, political science and cross-cultural psychology....

Change For The Better

Community Psychologists work on empowerment, diversity, community building, health promotion, civic participation and health promotion, using the two types of change models:

  • First-Order change shapes the individuals in order to prevent or fix a larger community issue.
  • Second-Order change modifies the broader social systems in order to make the individuals fit better into their environments.
Community Psychology: The Beginning

Community Psychology emerged in the 1960s when it was increasingly apparent that clinical psychology cannot address broader social and community-specific issues, especially the unique problems in mental health and well-being.

Now, the American Psychological Association(APA) has a section devoted to this subject and several academic journals are published in this rising field.

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Consciousness: A Subjective Awareness
Consciousness: A Subjective Awareness

Consciousness is your own awareness of your thoughts, memories, feelings, sensations, and environments. This awareness is subjective.

Your conscious experiences can change from one moment t...

Types of Consciousness

Changes in consciousness can result in changes in perception, thinking, and interpretations of the world.

  • Some different states of consciousness include dreams, hallucinations, hypnosis, meditation, sleep, and states induce by psychoactive drugs.
  • Altered levels of consciousness can occur and may be caused by medical or mental conditions that change awareness, e.g., coma, confusion, delirium, disorientation, lethargy, and stupor.
Changes in Consciousness

Changes of consciousness may be a sign of medical conditions, for example, aneurysm, brain infection, brain tumor or injury, dementia, drug use, epilepsy, heart disease, heatstroke, low blood sugar, poisoning, or shock.

If you think you are experiencing changes in consciousness, talk to your doctor.

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Cultural Intelligence (CQ)
Cultural Intelligence (CQ)
  • After IQ and EQ, Cultural Intelligence (CQ) is a new type of intelligence on the rise due to globalization and a complex, competitive and dynamic business environment.
  • Emp...
The Three Components Of Cultural Intelligence

Cultural Intelligence (CQ) is a system comprising of three well-connected components:

  1. Cultural Knowledge: The content and process knowledge of the various cultures.
  2. Cross-cultural Skills: A wide range of skills that pertain to the various facets of a culture, like relational, tolerance of uncertainty and ambiguity, adaptability, empathy, and the ability to understand other people's feelings.
  3. Cultural Metacognition: Also called cultural mindfulness, is the art of being aware of the cultural context, the subtleties of various situations, and the kind of strategies that can be taken.
How To Develop Cultural Knowledge

One can develop cultural knowledge through newspapers, movies, travelling to various countries, and interacting officially or personally with people of different cultures, learning new traditions, customs, cuisines, and rich new ways to live life.

One can identify and analyse the different cultures and utilize the knowledge in future.

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Meaning of White

New beginnings, lightness, perfection, purity, peace, innocence, neutrality, impartiality etc. In hospitals, white is a predominant color, it is aseptic and conveys calm.

It is an immaculate ...

Meaning of Yellow

Positive concepts like optimism, youth, confidence, and creativity. 

However, yellow is a contradictory color. It is also related to betrayal, greed, lies, insanity, warnings or socially rejected groups.

Meaning of Orange

The orange color immediately captures the attention of the person staring. 

According to color psychology, orange represents extravagance, energy, transformation, and uniqueness.

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The Psychology Of Color: Research Findings
The Psychology Of Color: Research Findings
  • Up to 90% of snap judgments made about products can be based on color alone (depending on the product).
  • Colors influence how consumers view the "personality" of the brand in question.
The Psychology Of Color - Misconceptions

Elements such as personal preference, experiences, upbringing, cultural differences, context, etc., often muddy the effect individual colors have on us. So assertions on the effect of colors are often not based on scientifically sound evidence.

Anthropology

It is the study of humans and the ways they live. The goal is to understand human diversity and cultural differences. The four primary sub-fields:

  • Archeology focuses o...
Sociology

It studies the ways groups of people interact with each other and how their behavior is influenced by social structures, categories, and institutions. It has many tenets:

  • Individuals belong to groups, which influence their behavior.
  • Groups have characteristics independent of their members.
  • Sociology focuses on patterns of behavior among groups (defined by gender, race, class, etc.)
Anthropology and sociology careers 

Anthropology and sociology degrees can lead to a career as a teacher, public sector employee, or academic. The degree can be a stepping stone to a career in politics, public administration, or law.

Non-academic careers for anthropologists include public sector research at organizations like the World Bank or UNESCO, or working as freelance research consultants.

Sociologists who have a PhD can work as analysts in public policy organizations, or as demographers, non-profit administrators, or research consultants.

The need to understand psychology

The beginnings of psychology differ significantly from contemporary conceptions of the field. Modern psychology covers a range of topics, looking at human behavior en mental processes from the neur...

The Beginnings of Psychology

Psychology was not separate from philosophy until the late 1800s.

  • During the 17th century, philosopher Rene Descartes introduced the idea of dualism - that the mind and body were two entities that interact to complete the human experience.
  • While early philosophers relied on methods such as observation and logic, today's psychologists use scientific methodologies to draw conclusions about human thought and behavior.
  • Physiological research on the brain and behavior also contributes to psychology.
Psychology as a Separate Discipline
  • During the mid-1800s, a German physiologist Wilhelm Wundt outlined many of the major connections between the science of physiology and the study of human thought and behavior.
  • He viewed psychology as the study of human consciousness and tried to apply experimental methods to study internal mental processes.
  • His processes are known as introspection and seen as unreliable and unscientific today, but it helped to set the stage for future experimental methods.
  • The opening of his psychology lab In 1879 is considered to be the official start of psychology as a separate scientific discipline.

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Creating quantitative models
Creating quantitative models

Most of the psychological theories are verbal, but words can be imprecise. If "cooperation is intuitive", it needs to state when. And what does "intuitive" mean?

In order to solve this, compu...

The Sims computer simulation

These models represent collections of individual people described by computer algorithms that capture a specific set of traits, such as a tendency to cooperate or not.

  • You can give them new personalities to see how they would behave.
  • You can observe social processes in action.
  • You can observe time scales, from seconds to generations.
  • You can watch the spread of certain behaviors throughout a population and you can see how certain behaviors influence other behaviors.

The patterns that emerge can tell you things about large-scale social interaction that lab experiments and real people never could.

The human instinct to cooperate

There seems to be evolutionary logic to the human ability to cooperate but adjust if necessary. To trust, but verify. 

We generally collaborate with other people because it benefits us. Our rational minds let us work out when we might occasionally gain by acting selfishly instead.

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