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Most of the Mind Can’t Tell Fact from Fiction

Confusing fiction with reality

When stories are done well, they are like artificial sweeteners - they fool the mind into thinking we're consuming the real thing.

For example, children sometimes really believe that puppets are alive. Even animals sometimes react to pictures as if they are real things.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Most of the Mind Can’t Tell Fact from Fiction

Most of the Mind Can’t Tell Fact from Fiction

http://nautil.us/blog/-most-of-the-mind-cant-tell-fact-from-fiction

nautil.us

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Key Ideas

Fiction and the mind

Stories, fiction included, act as a kind of replacement for life. You can learn information from them very effortlessly. You'll also remember false information without realizing and will find fictional stories emotionally arousing.

The reason we react to fiction as though it were real is that our mind does not even realize that fiction is fiction.

Confusing fiction with reality

When stories are done well, they are like artificial sweeteners - they fool the mind into thinking we're consuming the real thing.

For example, children sometimes really believe that puppets are alive. Even animals sometimes react to pictures as if they are real things.

Emotions influence our perception

The rational part of our mind knows that what we're looking at, or reading, isn't real. However, the perceptual areas of our brains are very closely connected to our emotions.

Emotions force us to interpret the world differently. Research reveals how fear can affect vision, moods can make us more or less susceptible to visual illusions, and desire can change the apparent size of goal-relevant objects.

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