Psychology Continues to Grow - Deepstash

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The Origins of Psychology: History Through the Years

Psychology Continues to Grow

Since 1960, psychology continues to develop new ideas and perspectives. Recent research in psychology looks at many aspects of human experience, from biological influences on behavior to the impact of social and cultural factors.

Today, psychologists focus on a specialty area or perspective, drawing from diverse theoretical backgrounds.

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Repression as a defense mechanism
Repression as a defense mechanism

Repression can best be defined as the psychological defense mechanism that involves pushing undesired thoughts into the unconscious in order to not think about them anymore.

While our consciousness keeps the thoughts and feelings we want to be aware of, the unconscious mind holds our entire history which, without the help of repression, might actually lead us to psychological distress.

Types of repression

Repression is of two types: primary and proper.

While the primary one takes into account the fact of hiding undesired thoughts or facts, the proper one takes place whenever an individual becomes aware of the thoughts that had initially been hidden and tries to hide them again.

Repression and its way of functioning

The objective of hiding our undesired thoughts in our unconsciousness is to feel less anxious.

However, Freud stated that this process can backfire at any point, as these hidden thoughts or feelings can still create anxiety, eventually leading to psychological distress.

Aphantasia: Image Not Found
Aphantasia: Image Not Found

Aphantasia is a phenomenon in which an individual cannot conjure an image of a face or thing in their minds. There is no inner ‘mind’s eye’ in these people and the mental imagery is essentially blank. People with Aphantasia can explain the object using words, but the mental image isn’t experienced.

Signs of Aphantasia include unable to vividly picture someone in one’s mind. It is estimated that about 1% to 3% of the population might be having Aphantasia.

Discovery of Aphantasia

Aphantasia was first described in the early 1800s by Francis Galton in a paper on mental imagery. It was not until 2015 that the phenomenon was further studied and the term was coined.

One of the major studies was with a patient who had undergone a minor surgery in 2005 and later could no longer generate visual images within the ‘mind’s eye’. The details of the study were published in 2010, which led to many others coming up with similar symptoms.

Binocular Rivalry

This was a technique used by the researchers to help test the image forming inside the brain of the individuals.

The experiment led to the finding that a recent viewing of an image had no correlation with the imagining of the image.

Our Internal Biological Clock
Our Internal Biological Clock
  • If we want to get more out of each day, we might need to consider synchronizing with our own internal body clock, working according to our peak periods of creativity, energy and activity.
  • Our biological clock controls most of our body’s functions, like the circadian rhythms that manage the sleep and wake cycles.
  • People working in shifts, for example, are thrown off their natural clocks, and experience fatigue, jet lag or sleep disturbances.
Our Natural Internal Thermostat

Our mental alertness, mood, stress, hunger levels, heart mechanism, and immunity are controlled by the various rhythms synced to the thermostat-like biological clock in our body.

Circadian rhythms control our eating habits, body temperature, digestion, hormone levels, resulting in a huge impact on our overall health. Any interruption in our circadian rhythm can lead to many health conditions known as lifestyle diseases.

The Best Time For Our Activities
  • Sleeping: Our age determines our body’s sleep cycle, with teens leading more sleep than adults. Afternoon naps are great for your health.
  • Eating: The time we eat might help us control our metabolism and prevent gastronomical problems, and altering your eating schedule resets your biological clock.
  • Exercising: Regular exercise is a must, and physical strength is at its peak from 2:00 pm to 6:00 pm.
  • Thinking: Our minds usually work best in the morning, making it the best time to tackle heavy activities. Concentration dips in the daytime when we feel sluggish, but new studies find that creativity is enhanced in a tired brain.