Focus on consistency - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

The Simplest Way to Generate a Major Breakthrough

Focus on consistency

If you have a goal of writing a book, and you focus on intensity, you may lock yourself away for thirty days, and write eight hours a day. It will require a huge block of dedicated time and lots of motivation.

  • Instead of writing a 50,000-word book in thirty days, write 500 words a day for 100 days.
  • Instead of going on a two-week fast to get in better shape, eliminate sugar and processed carbs from your diet.
  • Instead of waiting to start your business until you've quit your job, set aside three hours a week and start a side gig.

The intensity approach is more dramatic but slow and steady wins the race.

1062 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The Simplest Way to Generate a Major Breakthrough

The Simplest Way to Generate a Major Breakthrough

https://michaelhyatt.com/the-simplest-way-to-generate-a-major-breakthrough/

michaelhyatt.com

3

Key Ideas

Consistency over intensity

Some business coaches advise their clients to focus on taking massive action in order to get results.

While intensity may help occasionally, it's usually better to focus on consistency.

Focus on consistency

If you have a goal of writing a book, and you focus on intensity, you may lock yourself away for thirty days, and write eight hours a day. It will require a huge block of dedicated time and lots of motivation.

  • Instead of writing a 50,000-word book in thirty days, write 500 words a day for 100 days.
  • Instead of going on a two-week fast to get in better shape, eliminate sugar and processed carbs from your diet.
  • Instead of waiting to start your business until you've quit your job, set aside three hours a week and start a side gig.

The intensity approach is more dramatic but slow and steady wins the race.

Steps you can use to employ consistency

  • Get clear on your goal.
  • Identify the right behavior. (i.e., a habit).
  • Track your progress. Create a recurring task in your task manager to reinforce the habit.
  • Enlist an accountability partner. It could be someone who wants to achieve the same goal, a coach, or just a friend who is willing to support you.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Law of Diminishing Intent
The Law of Diminishing Intent

It states that the longer you postpone taking action, the less likely you will be to take it.

Jim Rohn originally noticed this phenomenon and coined the term.

The LEAP Principle

To counteract it the Law of Diminishing Intent, use the LEAP Principle, which states that you should never leave the scene of clarity without taking decisive action.

Taking a big LEAP
  • Lean into the change with confidence, especially if you are aware of the fact that a change is desirable or necessary.
  • Engage with the concept until you have a fair image about it. Work with it until you’ve got a sense of what to do.
  • Activate and do something. Don't wait until you feel you have all the information.
  • Pounce and do it now. Once you’ve determined your next step, take it.
Finding yourself in a funk
Finding yourself in a funk

From time to time, we may find ourselves in a funk where we experience an unusual amount of distraction and self-doubt.

Slouching, rounding shoulders, shallow breaths, ...

Boost your mood

We can change our emotional state by focusing on our physiology rather than our emotions. Using the following tricks can give you energy and an emotional boost to stay productive.

  • Put on some upbeat music.
  • Stand up and stretch. Try to reach the ceiling. Get on your tippy-toes.
  • Take several deep breaths. Oxygenating the blood make you more alert and awake.
  • Get your body moving. The more vigorous you can move, the better. Go for a run, a bicycle ride, or simply a walk outdoors. If you do it for long enough, your brain will release endorphins that elevate your mood.
  • Focus on the positive. Think positive thoughts. Give thanks for what you have rather than complaining about what you don't.
The history of refrigeration
The history of refrigeration

Refrigeration is the action of creating cooling conditions by removing heat. It is used for preserving food by slowing bacteria growth.

  • Around 1000BC, the Chinese u...
Evaporative cooling
  • 1720s. Scottish doctor William Cullen saw that evaporation had a cooling effect.
  • 1748. Cullen demonstrated his ideas by evaporating ethyl ether in a vacuum.
  • 1805. Oliver Evans designed a refrigeration machine that used vapor instead of liquid.
  • 1820. English scientist Micahel Faraday used liquefied ammonia for cooling.
  • 1835. Jacob Perkins, who worked with Evans, patented a vapor-compression cycle using liquid ammonia.
  • 1842. John Gorrie, an American doctor, built a machine similar to Evans's design to artificially create ice and cool down patients with yellow fever.
  • New and improved refrigeration ideas continued to be developed, including Albert Einstein's idea of an environmentally friendly refrigerator with no moving parts that did not rely on electricity.
  • By 1920, refrigerators were considered essential in American homes.
How refrigerators work

Refrigerators today work by evaporating liquids.

The liquids are pushed through the refrigerator through tubes and begin to vaporize. As the liquids evaporate, they carry heat away with them as the gases travel to a coil outside the refrigerator. Here the heat is released. The gases return to a compressor, where they become liquid again, restarting the cycle.

2 more ideas

Phone Interviews
Phone Interviews

Phone interviews are efficient time savers for both the candidate and the employer.

Initially considered a screening round for the benefit of the employer, a phone interview also helps the ...

Phone Interviews: A Level Playing Field

In-person interviews tend to focus less on the skills and experience, and more on who is more cordial or great to talk to. It does help build rapport in some cases, but also promotes an invisible bias towards the candidate’s race, gender, class and other factors unrelated to the job performance.

Phone Interviews level the playing field and let both the parties focus on the essential.

Building Rapport During Phone Interviews

A phone interview can also be used to build rapport, but instead of small talk, one can build up on the conversation, avoiding stiff, rehearsed responses to whatever the employer is asking.

If the conversation is genuine, one can easily connect with the employer on a human level.

4 more ideas