Management Potential - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

The reasons why people become incompetent at work

Management Potential

Apart from a regular performance review, some companies have started a different form of appraisal called the management potential review, which essentially gauges the leadership specific skills of an employee who may or may not score well in the performance review.

Better management training for upcoming leaders also plays a great role in grooming management talent.

102 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The reasons why people become incompetent at work

The reasons why people become incompetent at work

https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20200612-the-reasons-why-people-become-incompetent-at-work

bbc.com

4

Key Ideas

The Peter Principle and Occupational Incompetence

Peter J. Lawrence, whose 1969 bestseller “The Peter Principle” satirically provided many insights on the hows and the whys of incompetents working among us, is now being taken more seriously.

People are promoted to a job they are incapable of doing, based on their previous performance. This makes most employees rise to their level of incompetence.

Different Competencies

The skills that made a great performer excel, the aggression and the drive, did not translate well when the same performer was in charge of a team, where other skills like people management come into play.

The best teacher of the school cannot be simply promoted as a school principal.

Hiring The Right Person

A manager wouldn’t be able to handle a team of specialists (like Doctors or Scientists) efficiently, without any direct experience. This makes excelling at the current role a huge requirement for anyone being hired as a manager.

A fine balance between the two aspects is required while hiring, with one option being to change the hierarchy of the company itself. The person can be promoted without a typical career ladder, and continue to do his current role, which he is doing well.

Management Potential

Apart from a regular performance review, some companies have started a different form of appraisal called the management potential review, which essentially gauges the leadership specific skills of an employee who may or may not score well in the performance review.

Better management training for upcoming leaders also plays a great role in grooming management talent.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Promotion of Position = Demotion of Value
Promotion of Position = Demotion of Value

When a person is promoted, they usually turn to different responsibilities and roles which requires completely different skills and insights.

Later on, the company will notice that they made ...

Experience is not everything
Experience is a good thing, but this does not automatically make an employee the best person to be promoted to a more responsible job.

Before promoting an employee, the company should know the employee's level of knowledge, skills and ambitions. They should know if that person really deserves that spot. 

Saul Syndrome
Saul Syndrome

The Saul Syndrome is based on a biblical character named King Saul who crumbled because of his lack of character and integrity. And because of his pride, he disobeyed the Lord's command. Saul’...

Peter Principle vs. Saul Syndrome

Peter principle is about promoting people to their level of incompetence.

Saul syndrome promotes people beyond their integrity and character.

Promotion = Competence + Character

Because a leader must teach his followers not only to be competent, but to also develop their character as they progress.

Responses to the Peter Principle

"Women and minorities were exempted from the idea because they often weren’t promoted despite their competence and so didn’t get the chance to r...

A Reverse Peter Principle

Most managers address the bad boss problem by getting out of the subordinate role as quickly as possible and, by improving their own leadership skills, becoming a good boss.

Incompetence is Everywhere

Incompetence can also be seen on how subordinates deal with their bosses.

Workers feel anxious on how their bosses think about them. Should I correct my boss? Does he think of me as a competitor? Am I capable enough? Should I take an action?

Of course, everyone would think of those question before making a move. But a wise subordinate know can recognize that a boss does not know what he needs and the best thing to do is address their suggestions to the boss. Why? Because the boss is the one with the greater power to act.

one more idea

The Peter Principle

Also known as The Peter principle of Incompetence, it claims that people who do their job well are promoted to positions of greater responsibility, and so on, until they reach a position in whic...

Dilbert Principle

The Dilbert Principle refers to the idea that incompetent employees are being promoted to prevent them from causing harm, since higher level positions don't need to be involved in the production of the company, while people that perform well are retained to production jobs, to keep the company going forward.

The Dilbert Principle is just a variation of the Peter Principle and critics think that this principle is only valuable for amusement. 

Dilbert

Is a famous comic strip created by  Scott Adams that shows a humorous look in office life, but also manifests lessons on behavioral economics.

In a series of cartoons published throughout the 1990s, he coined the term the Dilbert Principle. The concept was so successful that in 1996 the book “The Dilbert Principle” was created, which became very successful and it ended up selling over a million copies.

The Peter Principle
The Peter Principle

It refers to an observation wherein people who perform well in their job gets promoted until eventually, they will reach a stage where they are incompetent for that job.

The Evidence for the Peter Principle

A study looked at promotions and performance of some 40,000 sales workers across 131 firms.

It showed that the best salespeople as measured by sales revenue are more likely to be promoted (top figure) but their value added as managers actually declines in their sales revenues (bottom figure).

The "Purpose" of Promoting Workers
  • To assign the suitable person to the managerial role.
  • To motivate workers excel in their current roles.

However, If firms promoted workers on the basis of managerial potential rather than current performance, employees may have fewer incentives to work as hard.

one more idea

The Peter Principle

It describes what can happen when an employee does well in one job and is subsequently promoted. She/he does well in the new role and is promoted again. This continues up and until the em...

Avoiding the Peter principle
  • Commit to continuous learning: heading off to a career thinking you’ve learned all you needed to know for the next 40-50 years is a sure way to find yourself stuck in a position you cannot move beyond;
  • Be mindful of what you are good at: there are certain career fields each of us know we are not best suited for.
Curiosity leads us to generate alternatives
Curiosity leads us to generate alternatives

When our curiosity is triggered, we are less likely to fall prey to confirmation bias (looking for information that supports our beliefs rather than for evidence suggesting we are ...

Curiosity and innovation

Encouraging people to be curious generates workplace improvements.

When we are curious, we view tough situations more creatively. Studies have found that curiosity is associated with less defensive reactions to stress and less aggressive reactions to provocation.

Reduced group conflict

Curiosity encourages members of a group to put themselves in one another’s shoes and take an interest in one another’s ideas rather than focus only on their own perspective.

Thus, conflicts are less heated, and groups achieve better results.

one more idea

Delegation = effective management skill

Without the ability to delegate effectively, it is impossible for you to advance in management to higher positions of responsibility.

Learning how to delegate is not only about maximiz...

Delegation method and staff experience
  • For new and inexperienced in the job staff -  use a directive delegation style (Tell exactly what you want them to do).
  • For staff that has experience in the job (they know what they are doing) - use the effective, management by objectives delegation method (Tell people the end result that you want and then get out of their way).
  • When the staff person is completely experienced and competent, your method of delegation in this case is simply, easy interaction.
Question to consider when before delegating
  • Who can do this job instead of you?
  • Who can do this job better than me?
  • Who can do this job at a lower cost than me?
  • Can this activity be eliminated altogether?

2 more ideas

The era of problem-solving generalists
The era of problem-solving generalists

From an era of specialized workers having expertise in one particular activity, the professional world has slowly moved towards problem-solving generalists. Workers are asked to don differe...

The pursuit of mastery

Mastery, once a sought-after attribute, is falling out of favour, according to the 2016 World Economic Forum report, and is slowly clearing the field for employees who can:

  • Have a diverse set of skills.
  • Can display the mental agility to switch between tasks.
  • Are able to pivot towards a new problem or activity.
  • Can take on a variety of roles at a short notice.
Expertise decline consequences

With the value of true expertise in serious decline, and the economy evolving towards a different set of requirements from employees, the impact on college education, career paths, worker safety, employability and even the nature of work is going to be profound.

2 more ideas

Humor at work
Humor at work

Being funny can have both positive and negative consequences, in your personal as well as your professional life. And context is always important: when making a joke, for instance, you should defin...

Humor and its effects on the status

Humor and status have always been tightly linked: good leaders seem to often use humor in order to motivate their team members' actions. As individuals, we tend to prefer, researchers claim, jokes that make us laugh while feeling slightly uncomfortable.

Furthermore, we perceive the joke teller as a self-confident person, who could easily become a leader due to his or her courage to make such a joke. The key point here is that the joke should be appropriate and match the context.

Inside jokes

Making inside jokes usually shows how bounded a team or a group is: their jokes can understood the best by themselves.

However, the moment an outsider integrates the group, it is better to avoid the inside jokes, as this will most probably make him or her feel out of place.

6 more ideas