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Why Rocking to Sleep Is a Matchless Sedative—and Elixir

Rocking Sleep

Rocking Sleep

Rocking babies back and forth while making them sleep is common as parents try to stop them from wailing and shouting. Even as adults, we can get lulled into sleep in the rhythmic motion of the train compartment or the hammock.

New studies show that our brains are evolutionarily programmed to respond positively to rocking, and it helps us sleep better.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Why Rocking to Sleep Is a Matchless Sedative—and Elixir

Why Rocking to Sleep Is a Matchless Sedative—and Elixir

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-rocking-to-sleep-is-a-matchless-sedative-mdash-and-elixir1/

scientificamerican.com

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Key Ideas

Rocking Sleep

Rocking babies back and forth while making them sleep is common as parents try to stop them from wailing and shouting. Even as adults, we can get lulled into sleep in the rhythmic motion of the train compartment or the hammock.

New studies show that our brains are evolutionarily programmed to respond positively to rocking, and it helps us sleep better.

Health Benefits Of Rocking

  • People who rock while sleeping tend to be less disturbed during the night and maintain their deep sleep longer.
  • The memory function improves by a factor of three, according to a study.
  • Rocking synchronizes the brainwaves in the ‘thalamocortical’ networks of the brain, helping both sleep and memory consolidation while improving one’s mood.

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