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How to Be More Productive by Hacking Your Perception of Time

Evolution of time management in 5 stages

Evolution of time management in 5 stages
  1. The Clock-Slave: you are either begging for the clock to speed up or slow down.
  2. The Time Tracker: some find it an excellent way of ensuring they stay on track. But when combined with excessive time pressure, it becomes unhealthy.
  3. The Smart Breaker: you use like the Pomodoro technique or the Ultradian rhythms.
  4. The Free Spirit: you opt for a more spontaneous and free life, and avoid keeping a rigid schedule at all costs.
  5. The Enlightened One: you understand that scarcity of time is an illusion. That enemy does not exist.

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How to Be More Productive by Hacking Your Perception of Time

How to Be More Productive by Hacking Your Perception of Time

https://dradambell.com/how-to-be-more-productive-by-hacking-your-perception-of-time/

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Key Ideas

Evolution of time management in 5 stages

  1. The Clock-Slave: you are either begging for the clock to speed up or slow down.
  2. The Time Tracker: some find it an excellent way of ensuring they stay on track. But when combined with excessive time pressure, it becomes unhealthy.
  3. The Smart Breaker: you use like the Pomodoro technique or the Ultradian rhythms.
  4. The Free Spirit: you opt for a more spontaneous and free life, and avoid keeping a rigid schedule at all costs.
  5. The Enlightened One: you understand that scarcity of time is an illusion. That enemy does not exist.

The scarcity spiral

When you are time-pressured, you see time as a precious and scarce resource. This triggers a stress response, which can improve motivation in the short term, but often at the expense of morale in the long term. And an unhappy worker is a less productive worker. With lower productivity, there is even more time pressure to get things done.

And on goes the cycle.

The inner tyrant

When a time constraint is placed on you, it will play on repeat in your head: “Get to work!”. If a task takes longer than expected, thoughts like “What is taking so long?" might appear. And at the end of a chaotic day, you might find yourself thinking “You have done nothing today!”.

But you can overthrow this tyrant.

The abundance spiral

Without the time pressure, you view time from an hourglass half-full perspective.

This perceived abundance of time improves wellbeing, which in turn increases productivity. When productivity is high, there is less time pressure, and time feels even more abundant.

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We All Are In A Spot

One has to realize that all kinds of people, upper-middle-class, middle or working class, have their job and livelihood at stake right now.

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Denying you have a problem

Stop saying that you don't have enough time to complete your commitments.

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It's important to have an idea of what your daily priorities are and tasks you need to complete, preferably the night before. 

Also, make sure you prepare in the evening the outfit you're going to wear and the meals for the following day. Doing this will save time in the morning, and reduce decision fatigue.

"Urgent" vs "Important"

Take all of your tasks and place them into four quadrants:

  • To do first: the most important responsibilities that need to be done today or tomorrow.
  • Schedule: important tasks that are not urgent.
  • Delegate: essential items that are not important.
  • Don't do: tasks that aren't important or urgent. 

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“What is important is seldom urgent and what is urgent is seldom important."
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The Decision Matrix on how to approach tasks has 4 quadrants:

  • Quadrant 1: The Urgent Problems which are important.
  • Quadrant 2: Not Urgent but important tasks
  • Quadrant 3: Urgent but not really important
  • Quadrant  4: Distractions and time-wasting tasks. 

Prioritize the important (Quadrant 2) to attain maximum benefit from your work.

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