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The Three Essential Properties of the Engineering Mind-Set

Guru Madhavan

"The core of the engineering mind-set is what I call modular systems thinking. It’s not a singular talent, but a melange of techniques and principles. Systems-level thinking is more than just being systematic; rather, it’s about the understanding that in the ebb and flow of life, nothing is stationary and everything is linked. The relationships among the modules of a system give rise to a whole that cannot be understood by analyzing its constituent parts."

Guru Madhavan

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The Three Essential Properties of the Engineering Mind-Set

The Three Essential Properties of the Engineering Mind-Set

https://fs.blog/2015/06/the-engineering-mind-set/

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Key Ideas

Thinking in Systems

It means to be able to break down a big system into its sections and putting it back together. The target is to identify the strong and weak links: how the sections work, don’t work, or could potentially work and applying this knowledge to engineer useful outcomes.

There is no engineering method, so modular systems thinking varies with contexts.

Fundamental Properties of the Engineering Mind-Set

  • The ability to see a structure where there’s nothing apparent.
  • Adeptness at designing under constraints.
  • The capacity to hold alternative ideas in your head and make considered judgments.

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