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How the brain builds a sense of self from the people around us – new research

Copying The People Around Us

Copying The People Around Us

Humans are able to reproduce the computations inside the brains of others.

Human beings are great at adapting the behaviours of others through observation. A new study shows that apart from learning through observing others behaviour, we also copy the minds of others as we grow older, learning how the people around us think and feel.

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How the brain builds a sense of self from the people around us – new research

How the brain builds a sense of self from the people around us – new research

https://theconversation.com/how-the-brain-builds-a-sense-of-self-from-the-people-around-us-new-research-141844

theconversation.com

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Key Ideas

Copying The People Around Us

Humans are able to reproduce the computations inside the brains of others.

Human beings are great at adapting the behaviours of others through observation. A new study shows that apart from learning through observing others behaviour, we also copy the minds of others as we grow older, learning how the people around us think and feel.

When Observational Learning Goes Wrong

When the process of observational learning and copying of brain computations goes wrong, it leads to many various mental health issues.

Certain complications that can arise include the inability to empathize with the other person, or erosion of one’s own ‘self’ due to other person thoughts being dominant.

Simulation Theory Of Empathy

It states that humans associate, anticipate and make sense of the other’s behaviour by activating certain mental processes, that when acted upon, produce similar behaviour.

This theory has useful implications in various mental health fields, as it can make people emulate desirable behaviour, training the brain to know and understand the other person based on their actions.

The Subjective Sense Of Self

The brain activity contains information not only about what’s going on in the world (objective) but also about who is thinking about the world (subjective).

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