The Nature of Beauty - Deepstash

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What Is Beauty? A Philosophical Quest for an Answer

The Nature of Beauty

The Nature of Beauty
  • The nature of beauty is a riddle in philosophy, with great figures engaging in trying to understand it, including Plato and Aristotle.
  • An aesthetic attitude makes the engagement and appreciation of beauty using our senses, like taste, smell, vision or touch.
  • Beauty can also be accessed in other ways like intellectually and through imagination.

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Defining Art
Defining Art
  • Art does not have a universal definition, though it is generally believed that it is an intentional and conscious creation of something that requires imagination and skill.
  • It can ...
Defining Art Through History
  • From the 11th century until the end of the 17th century, the definition of art was anything that was done with expertise, with the result of knowledge and practice.
  • The Romantic period of the 18th century, beauty became the main criteria for defining good art. Nature, spirituality and free expression were sought after and well received.
  • The 19th Century started the Avant-garde art movement, with art becoming real, modern, futuristic and surreal. Whatever the definitions, the originality of art stands out as a time-tested measure, with new genres and manifestations like performance art, digital art, and electronic art.
Philosophy of Art
  • Art as Representation or Mimesis. Representation of art as an imitation or copying became the mainstream meaning of art in Greece. Plato first developed the idea of art as “mimesis,” which, in Greek, means copying or imitation. How immaculately it replicated the original subject became the measure of its value.
  • Art as Expression of Emotional content. Dramatic, sublime and heartfelt art becomes a way to express oneself during the Romantic movement , with audience response becoming key to the valuation of the content. The emotions that were felt when the art was witnessed became its barometer for success.
  • Art as Form. Formal qualities of art became influential in the 18th century, with the principles of art and design, like balance, rhythm, harmony and unity became as important as the content of the work of art.
The beautiful mess effect
The beautiful mess effect

We don't expect other people to be perfect but appreciate when people show their vulnerabilities and admit errors. Yet, we're afraid to expose our own shortcomings.

Don't waste your experiences

Things fall apart for everyone. If you're wise, you can be resourceful and use the scraps, patch yourself up, and keep going.

Professor Brené Brown states that "vulnerability is courage in you and inadequacy in me." Brown sees the imperfections in people as gifts to be worked with, not embarrassments to be hidden.

The ordinary in extraordinary

The physical evidence of a life well-lived can be a source of pride rather than shame. We don't have to hide the white hair, lined skin, scars, or extra pounds. They can be seen as signs that you persist.

When we expect perfection from everyone, including ourselves, we not only discount much of what is beautiful but create an unrealistic, restrictive, and cruel world where people's flaws are highlighted. Instead, we should highlight the beauty of what we do have, flaws and all, rather than always grasping for more.

The Philosophy of The Nordic Design
The Philosophy of The Nordic Design

Nordic philosophy has a deep respect for functionality, clean lines, and longevity. Nordic design is created to be in harmony with its environment and a direct result of the region's cl...

Moving from Art Nouveau towards Art Deco

In 1915, a Danish company for decorative arts launched a magazine to promote local craftsmanship.

It was made to compete against the Art Noveau movement. Social commentary pressed more on the arts, which paved the way for Art Deco - an industrially-driven design philosophy.

The Golden Age of Scandinavian Design
  • In the 1930s, artists, inspired by the concepts of Constructivism, Functionalism, and Surrealism, paved the way for Nordic design's iconic milestones.
  • In the 1950s, the Lunning Prize (an equivalent of Nobel Prize) hailed exemplary designers who have given valuable contributions to Nordic Design from 1951 to 1970.
  • In 1954, a traveling exhibition comprised of the region's best designs landed in the United States and Canada and influenced the American culture.
  • In Denmark, Danish design thrived during the 1940s to the 1960s and created its own flavor, abandoning grandeur ornamentation in pursuit of form and function.
  • After WWII, Danish design has become a democratic movement, where makers turn to mass-producing natural raw materials such as ceramics, wood, and leather.
  • While the popularity declined in the 1970s, it had an upturn a decade later.