Distractions Can Be Useful - Deepstash

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Constantly distracted? Here's how to wrangle '21st-century syndrome'

Distractions Can Be Useful

The brain needs time and space to process information. The breaks we take during work, like talking to a colleague at the watercooler provides a ‘downtime’ and helps process information.

This takes the shape of distractions when we are at home. You could even be problem-solving while quietly doing the laundry at home, as your brain processes the events and information in the background.

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Remove external triggers

A simple way to accomplish this is to manage the notification settings on your smartphone. 

Try turning off personal email notifications. Unless social media is part of your job, consider turning off notifications from apps like Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter during work hours. Designate a specific time during your day to check personal communications.

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Minimize distractions

Minimizing or removing distractions is a great way to keep your productivity high, and it goes beyond just smartphones. 

The root cause is our emotional discomfort and a need to be distracted.

Plan your day calendar reflecting your values, and stay on the tasks at hand.