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Constantly distracted? Here's how to wrangle '21st-century syndrome'

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2020/jul/08/constantly-distracted-heres-how-to-wrangle-21st-century-syndrome

theguardian.com

Constantly distracted? Here's how to wrangle '21st-century syndrome'
Constantly distracted? Here's how to wrangle '21st-century syndrome' | Australian lifestyle | The Guardian

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The 21st-Century Syndrome

The 21st-Century Syndrome

This ‘21st-century Syndrome’ is due to two factors:

  1. An overabundance of dopamine-inducing options is taking its toll on our minds, making it difficult to relax.
  2. A sea of unprocessed emotions coupled with social disconnection is making us constantly uneasy.

Our brains are facing an onslaught of information and ‘supernormal stimuli’ from a variety of sources like social media, gaming, pornography and the likes.

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Distractions Can Be Useful

The brain needs time and space to process information. The breaks we take during work, like talking to a colleague at the watercooler provides a ‘downtime’ and helps process information.

This takes the shape of distractions when we are at home. You could even be problem-solving while quietly doing the laundry at home, as your brain processes the events and information in the background.

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Unshared Fears Lead Us Into Distraction

Our feelings, emotions and fears remain largely unshared at home, when we are trying to do many things at once, fighting countless battles single-handedly to balance everything.

Not having someone to talk to gets us into distractions, and when we force ourselves to not indulge, it makes us want to do it more.

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The Identity Pact

Providing yourself with an identity of the kind of person you aspire to be, like a non-smoker, a non-distractible person or someone who is sober and calm, provides a narrative for you to focus on.

The more you tell yourself what kind of person you are, the more it turns out to be true.

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Mastering ‘internal triggers'

To master time, master your ‘internal triggers.’

Try to understand the uncomfortable sensations you're trying to escape when you reach for your cell phone or email account, then learn ...

Tracking input

Many people use to-do lists without considering the amount of time it takes to complete a task

Practice  "timeboxing" your schedule: assigning a maximum amount of time for an activity. It can help give context and limits to ambiguous tasks.

Remove external triggers

A simple way to accomplish this is to manage the notification settings on your smartphone. 

Try turning off personal email notifications. Unless social media is part of your job, consider turning off notifications from apps like Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter during work hours. Designate a specific time during your day to check personal communications.

one more idea

Switch or change workplaces

People get tired of their surroundings and a spruce-up can boost their energy and creativity. 

Moving furniture or going to a fresh place can help your productivity.

Plan ahead when energized

Plan ahead for the week, month or year when you are energized and feeling motivated, for better results for getting stuff done.

Minimize distractions

Minimizing or removing distractions is a great way to keep your productivity high, and it goes beyond just smartphones. 

The root cause is our emotional discomfort and a need to be distracted.

Plan your day calendar reflecting your values, and stay on the tasks at hand.

The Impostor Syndrome And Our Expectations

The Impostor Syndrome And Our Expectations

The new generation has experienced a never-ending stream of expectations, where their achievements are never enough. They are always pushed up on the edge of perfection, being rated and scored ever...

Young Achievers With Impostor Syndrome

  • Most of the young achievers having impostor syndrome feel like a fraud and are constantly judging themselves as not being up-to-the-mark in their endeavours.
  • Their parents may have empathized on achievements too much, and engaged in praising or criticizing them during their formative years.
  • They might attribute their achievements to pure luck, but blame themselves for their failures.

Five Ways To Handle Impostor Syndrome

  1. Instead of a constant judgement of your thoughts, we must find acceptance and get curious over the feelings, dumping the negativity around them.
  2. Delving a bit into our own childhood, we can try to be compassionate towards ourselves, gently handling our emotions and worries.
  3. Realize that the feeling of impostor syndrome is just a byproduct of being out of your comfort zone, and into the learning zone.
  4. Make use of the impostor syndrome to work hard and push yourself to improvise, for yourself.
  5. Engage with such feelings in a healthy, objective way and understand that your achievements are a sign of your intelligence.