Too Much Of A Good Thing - Deepstash

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Good Things Taken Too Far

Too Much Of A Good Thing

Too Much Of A Good Thing

Good and effective things are helpful at one level but when taken too far, can be destructive.

In 1946, Sir Alexander Fleming, a renowned microbiologist, stated that antibiotics (like penicillin) were so effective that it will be abused by the masses, resulting in bacteria mutating and becoming drug-resistant. His prophecy came true, and this new, mutated bacteria is a reality.

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Good Things Taken Too Far

Good Things Taken Too Far

https://www.collaborativefund.com/blog/good-things-taken-too-far/

collaborativefund.com

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Key Ideas

Taking The Opposite View

  • In the field of investing, Contrarians take the opposite view, akin to cynicism, and think of the collective mainstream view as a kind of mass delusion.
  • Occasionally, a contrary view is welcome, but if it is done every time, then the good times when one has to simply ride the wave are missed, leading to bitterness.

Balancing Optimism

  • A positive attitude has the power to change our thinking and facilitate good things in our lives. Optimism surely beats pessimism as a worldview, when one has to pick a side.
  • Too much optimism turns into a delusion and eventually complacency. One starts getting out of touch with reality and lives in the mode of denial.

Being Open-Minded

  • As truth is complicated in this day and age, being open-minded takes us out of the bubble we develop around us, based out of our good and bad life experiences.
  • Being too open-minded robs us of our basic checks and balances, making us get lost in a rabbit hole full of contradictions.

One has to take a firm stand on their views to make concrete decisions.

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Antibiotic resistance
Antibiotic resistance

Antibiotics may lose their ability to treat bacterial infections.

Scientists have been warning us about the alarming rise in drug-resistant bacteria, but it can be curbed.

Penicillin
  • Penicillin was the first widely-used antibiotic. It was discovered in 1928 by Alexander Fleming, a bacteriologist.
  • He noticed that the staph cells he'd been studying in a petri dish had died, and an unusual mold was growing in it.
  • The mould was purified and tested in 1940, and later mass-produced.
  • By 1943, the US was supplying all the Allied forces with this miracle drug, which gave them an advantage in treating injuries.
Existing antibiotics found in the dirt
  • An agriculture student-turned-microbiologist, Selman Waksman, tested 10,000 soil samples over the years.
  • In 1943, he identified streptomycin, a broad-spectrum antibiotic effective against tuberculosis.
  • Drug companies caught on to it, and commissioned pilots, explorers, and foreign correspondents sent back soil samples as they traveled, collecting dozens of new antibiotics.
  • By 1970, researchers found themselves discovering the same molecules over and over.

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The placebo effect
The placebo effect

The placebo effect happens when a person takes medication that he thinks will help, but the medication has not been proven to be effective for the specific condition.

The subject-expectancy effect

When people know what the result of taking a pill is supposed to be, they might unconsciously change their reaction to cause that result or report that result has taken place even if it hasn't.

However, studies show that a placebo doesn't trick the brain - the brain reacts differently to a drug than a placebo. A 2004 study showed that the expectation of pain relief causes the brain's relief system to activate.

Placebos in research

Placebos are often used in clinical drug trials to determine how well a potential medicine will work.

  • There are two different groups of subjects in a placebo-controlled trial - one receives the experimental drug and the other the placebo. Neither researchers nor subjects know which group is receiving the real drug or the placebo.
  • Some researchers are questioning the placebo-controlled trial. Not everyone thinks a drug is ineffective if the placebo performs better.
  • Other critics of the placebo-controlled trial state it's wrong to attribute all positive outcomes to the placebo because many illnesses can resolve without any treatment.
  • When a patient takes a placebo and experiences adverse side effects, it's called a nocebo effect. Patients taking active drugs have also been known to have side effects that can't be directly attributed to the drug.

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The Power Of The Moon On Humans
The Power Of The Moon On Humans
  • The belief of the moon's power to drive the emotions and feelings of human beings is well-documented.
  • Lunacy is the word describing madness, directly connecting it to ...
The Effects Of The Lunar Cycle
  • Human beings tend to have disturbed sleep during full moon nights, even if they are not aware of the fact and didn’t see it.
  • Many studies for research the effect of the lunar cycle on human beings produced mixed results.
  • For every study that confirms the phenomenon, there are also many studies that debunk it.
  • The effect of the cycle on tides suggests that it can affect our bodies, which are 60 percent water.
  • Animal bite incidents double during full moon days, something that has perplexed researchers.
Full Moon Effect: Confirmation Bias

Many claims that link a change in human and animal behaviour during full moon nights may be related to confirmation bias, a tendency to fit new information into something that is already believed to be true.

The idea of the full moon creating havoc in our minds, making us sleepless and violent is a legend that went mainstream, and could likely be stories of just a few people who are affected by the lunar force, and need to be studied more.