Seeking advice - Deepstash

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Why Asking for Advice Might Be Better Than Asking for Feedback

Seeking advice

Seeking advice over feedback opens up an opportunity for suggestions to improve or even advice on how to find solutions to your weakness.

It takes a willingness to acknowledge a problem you have. Good advice can be your greatest learning experience, especially when coming from someone who has already succeeded in that area.

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Be transparent about your goals

Whether you are looking for general information about the next steps in your career or are curious about a specific concept you're not familiar with, let people know what kind of information you are after and why you are asking in the first place.

Express gratitude

... before and after seeking advice. Gratitude has been shown to promote honesty, productivity, and overall well-being in the workplace, and can be used as a tool to ease any interaction, including asking for advice.

If a co-worker agrees to meet for coffee and share a lot of advice with you, emphasize how much you appreciate their time.

Ask the right kinds of questions
  • Show your interest and keep the conversation flowing. 
  • Follow-up questions can make conversations less superficial.
  • People are more willing to reveal sensitive or personal information when the toughest questions are asked at the beginning of the conversation. 
  • Active listening will show your advice-giver that you are engaged and care about what is being discussed.
Negative Feedback
Negative feedback is a more important component of the feedback cycle than positive feedback. 92% of people say in a study that negative feedback improves workplace performance.

To do it right:

  • Check how it will impact the individual
  • Make it guidance or advice
  • Be direct
  • Let it be an area of improvement information
  • Build a culture of trust.
Why are people scared of Feedback

Normally people react with caution and fear towards negative feedback, but it is much better than no feedback at all.

Informing the colleague/subordinate/client/customer or individual about something that is not working, is always beneficial, and builds transparency and trust.

Check how it impacts the person

The fundamental goal of giving feedback is to help the person you’re giving it to. They should realize that you are not trying to make them feel bad, and this is an exercise to help make them better.

How it impacts each individual is going to be different so a tailor-made approach is required. 

Why We Avoid Asking For Advice
Why We Avoid Asking For Advice

Most people shy away from asking for advice when they cannot figure out how to finish a tricky task or assignment at work.

  • Reasons range from not wanting to bother anyone, or not trusting them for the solution that might be provided.
  • There is also a misconception that others will think less of the person asking for advice.
  • Advice seekers have a false psychological fear that the person whom they ask will refuse and embarrass them. Research proved that this is deeply unfounded and we grossly underestimate how helpful and assistive people can be.
Advice Seekers Appear Smarter

The fear of appearing incompetent or an incompetent person is misplaced, as research shows that the person who is asked for advice thinks good of the person asking.

Advice seekers appear smarter to the person whose ego is now stroke, making him provide valuable insights while being impressed by the seeker. Being asked for advice increases the level of perceived competency of the seeker in the eyes of the expert.

Connection Made Thorugh Advice

Asking for advice leads to a series of interactions at the office, which gives way to exchanging information, learning and builds a meaningful connection that goes beyond the initial request for advice.