How We Perceive Abstract Art - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

Viewing abstract art causes notable cognitive changes

How We Perceive Abstract Art

How We Perceive Abstract Art

A new study that may be good news for both kinds of art lovers states that abstract art alters our minds cognitive state, causing measurable cognitive changes in the viewer.

Many people think modern, abstract art isn’t real art, and there are also others who deeply understand and appreciate it.

107 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Viewing abstract art causes notable cognitive changes

Viewing abstract art causes notable cognitive changes

https://bigthink.com/mind-brain/abstract-art-distance

bigthink.com

2

Key Ideas

How We Perceive Abstract Art

A new study that may be good news for both kinds of art lovers states that abstract art alters our minds cognitive state, causing measurable cognitive changes in the viewer.

Many people think modern, abstract art isn’t real art, and there are also others who deeply understand and appreciate it.

Abstract Art and Psychological Distance

  • There is a psychological distance that we create in our minds in relation to other people, things, events and times. Things that are close to us often seem more real and tangible.
  • Abstract art has a noticeable and measurable effect on our general cognitive state as we place it far away in a distant place. When a person views abstract art, the mind strives to find meaning in it, as it appears far away.
  • Normal art is already clear and understandable, making us place it near ourselves as we note small details of the painting.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Defining Art
Defining Art
  • Art does not have a universal definition, though it is generally believed that it is an intentional and conscious creation of something that requires imagination and skill.
  • It can ...
Defining Art Through History
  • From the 11th century until the end of the 17th century, the definition of art was anything that was done with expertise, with the result of knowledge and practice.
  • The Romantic period of the 18th century, beauty became the main criteria for defining good art. Nature, spirituality and free expression were sought after and well received.
  • The 19th Century started the Avant-garde art movement, with art becoming real, modern, futuristic and surreal. Whatever the definitions, the originality of art stands out as a time-tested measure, with new genres and manifestations like performance art, digital art, and electronic art.
Philosophy of Art
  • Art as Representation or Mimesis. Representation of art as an imitation or copying became the mainstream meaning of art in Greece. Plato first developed the idea of art as “mimesis,” which, in Greek, means copying or imitation. How immaculately it replicated the original subject became the measure of its value.
  • Art as Expression of Emotional content. Dramatic, sublime and heartfelt art becomes a way to express oneself during the Romantic movement , with audience response becoming key to the valuation of the content. The emotions that were felt when the art was witnessed became its barometer for success.
  • Art as Form. Formal qualities of art became influential in the 18th century, with the principles of art and design, like balance, rhythm, harmony and unity became as important as the content of the work of art.

3 more ideas

The Concept of Graffiti
The Concept of Graffiti

Graffiti, or the practice of writing, drawing, painting or doodling on walls and other surfaces is as old as man himself, with prehistoric and ancient cave paintings of hunting scenes being the fir...

Modern Graffiti
  • Contemporary graffiti dates back to 1967, arising from the Black and Latino communities in New York City, with the aerosol spray paint acting as a catalyst.
  • The artists, known as taggers, used to ‘tag’ or paint in as many locations as possible, with the intention to ‘get up’, having maximum people see the art.
  • Subway cars and trains became the next big thing to ‘tag’ with graffiti, as their mobile nature ensured that more people would see it. The giant artwork had a unique energy and aura while it moved, creating an effect that is not possible on a static wall.
NYC Graffiti Problem

In about a decade, the ‘vandalism’ of infrastructure and public property became a big problem in NYC, as it had a negative psychological effect on every citizen. The authorities put in measures to make it harder for the writers to hit their targets, but it just made the game more challenging and interesting for the artists.

Extreme steps were taken in 1984 to clear NYC of Subway car/train graffiti, and commuters had to face hardships, but the practice of street graffiti flourished in the coming decades.

6 more ideas

Familiar Traits

Psychologist Carl Jung had once hypothesized that the traits we find irritating in someone else can tell us a lot about ourselves. Many studies have confirmed this insight.

We seem to be a...

The Villain Inside Us

New studies show that we tend to like villains who are like us. The researchers analyzed the data of thousands of members, revealing that while we like heroes, the villains who look cool and remind us of ourselves are very well-liked.

These studies pave the way for further investigation and research into our interpersonal relationships being affected by our (and others) positive and negative traits. They also explains why we go on loving our loved ones, even after being fully aware of their flaws.

Describing wonder

Wonder is said to be a childish emotion. However, as adults, we experience it when gaping at something unexpectedly spectacular.

Adam Smith, an 18th-century moral philosopher, describes wond...

Bodily symptoms

The bodily symptoms of this strange appearance point to three dimensions:

  • Sensory: The marvelous things take hold of our senses - we stare and widen our eyes.
  • Cognitive: We are perplexed because we don't have a past experience to understand them. It leads to a suspension of breath, similar to when we are startled.
  • Spiritual: We look upwards in veneration, which makes our heart swell.
The scale of wonder

At the mild end of this emotion, we talk about things being marvelous. More intense emotions might be described as astonishing. The extreme of this experiences is met with expressions of awe.

3 more ideas

Why we like art

Art is most exciting when it creates states of psychological conflict, confusion, or dissonance.

While in other circumstances, such an onslaught might make us run a mile, with art, we ...

Visual indeterminacy

It occurs when we are presented with something that we don't immediately recognize. It creates a degree of cognitive dissonance that may be frustrating or even unpleasant.

For example, seeing a vague shape in the corner of a room that might be a cat or a bag. A second look is needed to satisfy our curiosity.

Color conflicts

Complementary colors lie opposite one another on the spectrum. For example, red complements blue, yellow complements violet.

When complementary colors are placed in close proximity, it is apt to cause conflict and disturb the eyes. Used subtly, it can make our eyes dance to a discordant tune.

2 more ideas

Loneliness is a perception issue
Loneliness is a perception issue

Loneliness has more to do with our perceptions than how much company we have: it is just as possible to feel very lonely surrounded by people as it is to be content with little social contact.

Olivia Laing
Olivia Laing

“Loneliness, longing, does not mean one has failed but simply that one is alive.”

Dealing with loneliness through creativity

One way people have always dealt with loneliness is through creativity. By metamorphosing their reality into art, lonely people throughout history have managed to interchange the sense of community relationships could foster with their creative outputs.

The artist Edward Hopper (1882–1967) is known for his paintings of American cityscapes inhabited by closed-off figures who seem to embody a vision of modern loneliness.

2 more ideas

First impressions

In less than one-tenth of a second of seeing someone for the first time, our brain processes information about the person’s face—which leads to quick conclusions about a new acquaintance’s quali...

Know your context

It’s important to first consider where you are trying to make a good impression—whether it’s a formal job interview or a dinner date. 

Context matters. It gives you cues as to how you should dress, speak, look and behave, in a way that matches the setting you are entering to. That is a key aspects of making a good impression. 

Adjust your attitude

Try not to look bored, rude or hostile.

A useful attitude is welcoming, curious and enthusiastic: smile, make eye contact long enough to notice the color of that person’s eyes, sit without crossing your arms or legs. This project a positive, open warm impression.

4 more ideas