How We Perceive Abstract Art

How We Perceive Abstract Art

A new study that may be good news for both kinds of art lovers states that abstract art alters our minds cognitive state, causing measurable cognitive changes in the viewer.

Many people think modern, abstract art isn’t real art, and there are also others who deeply understand and appreciate it.

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MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

  • There is a psychological distance that we create in our minds in relation to other people, things, events and times. Things that are close to us often seem more real and tangible.
  • Abstract art has a noticeable and measurable effect on our general cognitive state as we place it far away in a distant place. When a person views abstract art, the mind strives to find meaning in it, as it appears far away.
  • Normal art is already clear and understandable, making us place it near ourselves as we note small details of the painting.

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RELATED IDEAS

Figurative art and conventional photography have a limitation of simply imitating or reproducing on canvas what is already existing in reality, and thus is constrained to an extent.

Abstract art is powerful as it transcends the limits of thought and provides unlimited possibilities to explore the many dimensions of human emotions, with each artist using a unique, visual language of lines and colour.

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IDEAS

Art should appeal to you first through your senses. It should grab your eye in some way, such as its subject matter, its use of color, its realistic appearance, a visual joke, or any other factors.

Once you've gotten an overall look at the painting, ask yourself what the subject of the painting is. It might be a landscape, a person or group of people, a scene from a story, a building, an animal, etc. Some paintings will be abstract.

New studies show that we tend to like villains who are like us. The researchers analyzed the data of thousands of members, revealing that while we like heroes, the villains who look cool and remind us of ourselves are very well-liked.

These studies pave the way for further investigation and research into our interpersonal relationships being affected by our (and others) positive and negative traits. They also explains why we go on loving our loved ones, even after being fully aware of their flaws.

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