Abstract Art and Psychological Distance - Deepstash

Abstract Art and Psychological Distance

  • There is a psychological distance that we create in our minds in relation to other people, things, events and times. Things that are close to us often seem more real and tangible.
  • Abstract art has a noticeable and measurable effect on our general cognitive state as we place it far away in a distant place. When a person views abstract art, the mind strives to find meaning in it, as it appears far away.
  • Normal art is already clear and understandable, making us place it near ourselves as we note small details of the painting.

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MORE IDEAS FROM Viewing abstract art causes notable cognitive changes

How We Perceive Abstract Art

A new study that may be good news for both kinds of art lovers states that abstract art alters our minds cognitive state, causing measurable cognitive changes in the viewer.

Many people think modern, abstract art isn’t real art, and there are also others who deeply understand and appreciate it.

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Abstract Art: Many Shades And Hues

Visually different from figurative art, abstract art came in the early 20th century and used colours, lines, forms and shapes to create unseen compositions, with little or faint relation with the outside world.

It expanded upon the artist’s freedom of expression, imagination, inner turmoil, spirituality and spontaneity.

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The development of minimalism

Minimalism emerged in the late 1950s when artists such as Frank Stella, whose Black Paintings were exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1959, began to turn away from the gestural art of the previous generation.

It flourished in the 1960s and 1970s with Carl Andre, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Sol LeWitt, Agnes Martin and Robert Morris becoming the movement’s most important innovators.

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Defining Art
  • Art does not have a universal definition, though it is generally believed that it is an intentional and conscious creation of something that requires imagination and skill.
  • It can be thought of as a symbol of what it means to be human, manifested in physical form for others to see and interpret.
  • The word ‘art’ originates from the Latin word ‘ars’ that means skill or craft.
  • Art, like beauty, is subjective, and its valuation and definition changes as time goes by.
  • To understand art one has to see it’s essential nature and the social impact or importance it generates.

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