Lasting Creations In Ancient Rome

The Roman roads were built of several layers of stone and cement and were able to last for millennia due to the high level of craftsmanship and scientifically created design to withstand heavy loads and all weather conditions.

The Roman baths in Algeria are still used, 2000 years after being made. The Roman Amphitheatre in France called the Arena of Nîmes still has live concerts in this age. The roads, of course, have left the greatest mark, with their alignments and routes still in use, now overlaid with modern roads.

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Roads In Ancient Rome

Ancient Rome built sophisticated infrastructure ranging from bridges, amphitheatres, aqueducts and even sewer systems.

The Roman network of roads, called Viae Romanae and meaning ‘Roman Ways’ was a huge breakthrough in quick and easy transportation of trade goods, military supplies, and free movement of civilians and soldiers.

  • The first roads were invented in the Bronze Age in 4000 BCE, created by the older Indus Valley Civilization. This was the first time that straight, 90 degree intersecting roads were seen.
  • The Roman civilization created advanced road systems that encouraged travel and connection, forming a lifeline of connecting various cultures, institutions and beliefs.
  • The Romans managed to create major roadways and highways with traffic segregation, something unheard of before.
  • They had 372 roads with 29 major highways. The first major roadway was called the Appian Way, connecting Rome with Capua, back in 312 BCE. This road was used efficiently during the Samnite Wars in the same era.
Ancient Rome: Origins
  • Rome was founded in 753 BCE by Romulus, the first king, and the son of Mars, the God Of War.
  • Rome knew three eras: The Period of Kings from 625 to 510 BCE, Republican Rome from 510 to 31 BCE and Imperial Rome from 31 BCE to 476 CE.
  • The Roman empire consisted of Spain, Portugal, France, Belgium, England, Wales, parts of Germany, and many territories in Central Europe and Africa.

Like so many large malls with built-in theatres nowadays, a grand plaza known as ‘The Forum’ became an influential marketplace and later the main civic center in Rome. It was a place where gladiatorial fights, court sessions, shopping and ceremonial activities happened.

A monument called Milliarium Aureum or the Golden Milestone was built there in 20 BCE.

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The foundation legends of Rome
  • One legend is that Ancient Rome was founded on 21 April 753 BCE by two brothers and demigods, Romulus and Remus. But Romulus killed Remus in an argument of who should rule and then named the city after himself.
  • Another legend is that the city was named after Roma, a woman. The fall of Troy caused the survivors to move on. When they landed on the banks of the Tiber River, Roma and other women objected to moving on.
  • Others think the city came from Rumon, the name for the Tiber River.

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Historical Significance Of Florence, Italy

Known as the ‘Jewel Of Italian Renaissance’, the city of Florence has countless groundbreaking developments, seeing advances in politics, finance, business, engineering, philosophy, science, architecture, and artistic creativity. The 15th century CE, the golden age of Florence saw many historic art projects, even after a pandemic killed half of the city’s population.

Currently, Florence is the capital of Tuscany, Italy, and its most populous. The breathtaking scenery and long history make it one of the most beautiful cities in the world.

Alexandria during the third and second centuries BCE

Alexandria, with its Great Library, was marked as the intellectual capital of the world.

During the third century BCE, the Musaeum, an educational and research institution, was built in Alexandria. The Great Library was one part of the Musaeum and may have held around 700,000 scrolls (equivalent to over 100,000 printed books.)

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