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You Can Still Burn Out While Working From Home. These Are The Signs.

WFH Burnout Symptoms

Burnout is experienced in a different shade at home, where the symptoms tend to be tiredness, confusion, forgetfulness, frustration and anger. As the mood starts to dip slowly, the mind reaches a low state, from which it is hard to climb back.

Taking a vacation is a great idea, to begin with, even if you don’t really go anywhere. The idea is to take a break from your work.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

You Can Still Burn Out While Working From Home. These Are The Signs.

You Can Still Burn Out While Working From Home. These Are The Signs.

https://www.huffingtonpost.in/entry/work-from-home-burnout_l_5f172729c5b6cac5b732a39c

huffingtonpost.in

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Key Ideas

Burnout When Working From Home

Working from home does not necessarily mean we are enjoying life and can’t be in stress. Work can feel dull and monotonous as there is comparatively less movement or change of scenery.

With most interactions becoming virtual, one can feel trapped in this scenario with nothing to look forward to.

Burnout And The World Health Organization

  • According to the World Health Organization, Burnout is classified as an occupational phenomenon, also known as vital exhaustion.
  • It is a syndrome resulting from chronic workplace stress and anxiety, causing physical and mental problems.
  • The symptoms include energy depletion, exhaustion, increased mental distance, a negative outlook towards one’s job and diminished productivity.

WFH Burnout Symptoms

Burnout is experienced in a different shade at home, where the symptoms tend to be tiredness, confusion, forgetfulness, frustration and anger. As the mood starts to dip slowly, the mind reaches a low state, from which it is hard to climb back.

Taking a vacation is a great idea, to begin with, even if you don’t really go anywhere. The idea is to take a break from your work.

Set Boundaries Between Work and Personal Activities

  • If possible, have separate places for work, rest or discussion when working from home.
  • Make yourself a mini work area in the corner of the room rather than working all over the house on your laptop.
  • Set boundaries with your family and loved ones, letting them know the times you would be working.
  • Have a ritual like doing some exercise, going for a jog, followed by a bath to set your mind in ‘work mode’ while establishing a time gap, to transition yourself to work. This emulates the office commute and gets you in your mental work zone.

Recover From WFH Burnout

If you already feel burnt out:

  1. Go for a walk and sit alone for a while.
  2. If that is not possible, go take a shower and provide your thoughts with some space.
  3. Turn off the screens around you and do something that brings you joy.
  4. Avoid smoking/drinking.
  5. Connect with your loved ones.
  6. Get some exercise
  7. Do a self-care activity.
  8. Try to work smart, not hard.
  9. Practice mindfulness.
  10. Do a gratitude exercise that focuses on the positive.

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HR departments worldwide are fueling the use of technology to have a way to control the employees that are now no longer in the office.

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High tolerance to frustration

People with high frustration tolerances are the ones that generally succeed at remote work. And you can take steps to raise your frustration tolerance and become more conscientious by working on your impulsivity.

A non-conscientious person will find another activity (a distraction most likely) the moment something challenging or uncomfortable comes up. They have to be more conscious to stay in the moment: count to five or take five deep breaths, for example.

A lack of boundaries

When work and personal activities are occurring in the same space, there are no cues for you to behave the way you do at work while you are outside your physical office.

Those who work well from home create boundaries in a work-life world without them. Then, once these parameters are established, people who commit fewer ‘boundary violations’ are better off.

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The “work first” mindset

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Don’t overdo it

If you start making mistakes and you feel dizzy after working a certain number of hours, don't overdo it.
This is a sensitive topic if you have a boss, but observe the number of hours you are functioning the best. If you have 7 hours of productive work in you per day, use them. But if your battery runs out after 5 hours, call it a day.

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Experiment with them and find which one better suits you.
Create your own system for working from home. What works for other people might not work for you.

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Remote working vs working in an office

While there are many benefits to working from home, we need to be aware of a few things.

  • Remote workers may be working on average 3.13 more hours at home than at work. Over time, it can become detrimental to your mental health and your productivity.
  • You're eating and exercise habits may become worse while you're working from home. Fifty percent of respondents to the Bluejeans survey say they have not been able to exercise regularly.
  • Distractions can cut your productivity. The most commonly reported distractions that remote workers face are taking care of kids (27.6 percent), scrolling through social media (26.5 percent), checking on the news (26.1 percent), and getting distracted by streaming services (9.7 percent).
Healthy changes to make

The rapid shift to remote working has proven many jobs are capable of being done at home. There are some changes that we need to make if this is going to continue.

  • Separate your home and work responsibilities. Between checking the news and taking care of your children, you may feel pressure to work more.
  • Take regular breaks from work, even just for 10 minutes. It is easy to feel that you're always "being on" - which is how burnout happens. Periodically "signing off" allows you to recharge.
  • A solution may be fewer days per week at home. A 4-day workweek can improve worker's productivity by up to 40 percent.
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Aches and pains

With the 2020 pandemic, many people are required to stay home.

If you're one of these people, you may be noticing new aches and pains you did not experience at the office.

Ergonomic furniture

Many companies follow an ANSI-HFS standard in the design of their computer workstations, which incorporates ergonomic furniture and accessories.

Most homes don't have the space to accommodate ergonomic office furniture, nor do most people invest in it. If you're working from home using your computer on a regular table or you sit in a lounge chair or on your bed, chances are you aren't in a healthy posture. It could potentially lead to musculoskeletal injury, carpal tunnel syndrome, or even deep vein thrombosis.

Your computer screen

View your computer screen with a straight neck. Put your screen in front of you at a comfortable viewing height. Don't look down at your screen or angle your screen, so you must twist your neck.

You may have to put the screen on a pile of books or on a cardboard box to raise it to a comfortable viewing position.

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The signs of burnout
  • You dread going to work in the morning.
  • You show up late or find reasons to leave early.
  • You feel bored or don’t want to engage with the work when you’re there.
  • You’re ...
Find friends outside of work

If your only friends are your friends at work, it'll be more challenging to avoid work on evenings and weekends. If you do have coworkers as close friends, consider setting some boundaries around work talk.

Try to avoid getting drawn into office drama, as it will increase the time you spend talking and thinking about work.

Speak up

Speak up when your workload is too much. Tell your boss if you are stretched too thin or when you regularly work too many hours. Talk about what you can reasonably get done in a week.

Also, don't say yes to everything. If you have a hard time saying no, don't respond immediately. Instead say, "Let me get back to you", or, "Let me think about that."

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Burnout is not the same as tired

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  • you become cynical and detached from...
3 Secrets to avoid burnout
  • Be Optimistic. Confronted by a bad situation, optimists perceive it as a challenge and try harder.
  • Find Meaning In What You Do. When you find true meaning in your work — when it’s not a job, it’s a calling — you don’t burn out.
  • Double Down On Relationships. Those who increase their social activity when things get hard handles stress the best.

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Daily Morning Huddle with Coffee Chats

An informal daily huddle where everyone is face-to-face in a virtual meeting, holding a fresh cup of coffee is a great way to start the day with purpose and energy. It requires everyone to wake up early, get dressed and make a cup of coffee.

A morning routine is great for productivity too.

Dance Parties And Music Playlists

Infusing music and dance in your breaks can add a sense of pleasure in the otherwise dull and drab routine, enhancing the immediate virtual surrounding of the extroverts.

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Psychological Effects of Working from Home
  • Loneliness and isolation. And loneliness is associated with higher rates of depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms like random pain.
  • Anxiety and pressure. The bounda...
Symptoms of Depression
  • Angry outbursts, irritability, or frustration, even with unimportant matters.
  • Loss of interest or happiness in activities such as sex or hobbies.
  • Sleep disturbances, including insomnia and sleeping too much.
  • Tiredness and lack of energy for even the smallest activities.
  • Increased cravings for food.
  • Anxiety, agitation, and restlessness.
  • Trouble thinking, concentrating, making decisions, and remembering things
  • Unexplained physical problems, such as back pain or headaches
  • Avoiding people.
Take Care of Your Mental Health

...while working from home:

  • Create a schedule and stick to it. Scheduling your tasks (and breaks) will help you to mentally prepare for the day.
  • Have a dedicated comfortable workspace, with a door that closes, preferably.
  • Fight the urge to stay sedentary and schedule active time to get your heart pumping.
  • Foster social connections (on the phone or via the internet, if physical contact is not possible).
  • Learn to say no. Know your limitations, set boundaries based on your schedule and workload, and don’t extend yourself beyond them.