The Nobel Prize and Global Recognition - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

How the Meaning of the Nobel Peace Prize Has Evolved

The Nobel Prize and Global Recognition

The nominations for the Peace Prize has gradually increased from the first year it was recorded in 1904, swelling from 22 to 376 in 2016.

Media coverage regarding the awards is also much bigger than before, resulting in an increased awareness of the prize.

41 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How the Meaning of the Nobel Peace Prize Has Evolved

How the Meaning of the Nobel Peace Prize Has Evolved

https://time.com/5746538/nobel-peace-prize-evolution/

time.com

4

Key Ideas

The Nobel Prize

  • The Nobel prize is described as the worlds’ most prestigious prize in the Oxford Dictionary of Contemporary History.
  • Sitting inside the Grand Hall at the Nobel Institute, the Norwegian Nobel Committee announces the nominations in October every year, something looked at with great interest from politicians and journalists.
  • The awards are presented on 10th December, a date coinciding with Alfred Nobel’s death anniversary.

The Nobel Prize and Global Recognition

The nominations for the Peace Prize has gradually increased from the first year it was recorded in 1904, swelling from 22 to 376 in 2016.

Media coverage regarding the awards is also much bigger than before, resulting in an increased awareness of the prize.

Esteemed Common Man

When Muhammad Yunus received the prize in 2006 for his micro-credit initiative to thousands of poor people which became Grameen Bank, many people thought the name of the prize winner was the name of the bank.

Humanitarian work by the common man was rewarded since the inception of the prize but is well-known now due to increased exposure and media coverage.

Environmental Work and The Nobel Prize

  • As global warming and climate change came in the picture, something which was criticized by many committee members, as there was no such concept during the time of Alfred Nobel.
  • His ideology for the prize had the first criterion as ‘fraternity between nations’ which can be argued as fighting together to save the planet from whatever problem threatens it.
  • This is also an example of how the prize has stayed relevant over the years.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Early History

The connection between genius and possible insanity was first documented in 1891 in the Italian physicians’ book The Man Of Genius.

In 1869, this was taken up by the cousin of Charles Darwi...

Genius and Heredity

In a 1904 study by English physician Havelock Ellis, a list was made of 1030 individuals through extensive research, examining thoroughly the intellectual distinction people had by the various factors like heredity, general health, and social class.


These works established that genius minds are often hereditary.

Genetic Studies Of Genius

A body of work of Stanford psychologist Lewis M. Terman, was an in-depth multi-decade study of gifted individuals, and an attempt to improve the measurement of genius and its association with the degradation of mental stability. This also included an enhanced version of the French IQ (Intelligence Quotient) test.

10 more ideas

Doing what you love is complicated

As kids, playing was described as fun while work was pretty much defined as not-fun. In school, it was implied that work was monotonous because it was in preparation for grownup work. Grownups a...

Bounds

Keep in mind this question: How much are you supposed to enjoy what you do? If you underestimate your answer, you'll tend to stop searching too early.

Liking your work does not mean doing what makes you happiest in this second, but what will make you most satisfied over a more extended period, like a week or a month. Your work should be your favorite thing to do. It should be something you admire.

What you should not do
  • Don't worry about the opinion of anyone beyond your friends.
  • Don't worry about prestige. Prestige is the opinion of the rest of the world. If you do anything well enough, you'll make it prestigious.
  • Don't be led astray by money, especially when money is combined with prestige.

A test of whether you love what you do is if you would do it even if you weren't paid for it. (Even if you had to work at another job to make a living.)

3 more ideas

The reward system

The reward system in our brain exists to ensure we seek out what we need. If eating nutritious food or being smiled at pleases us, we try to secure more of these stimuli. However, seeking pleasure ...

Desire and pleasure

In 1986, a discovery was made that dopamine did not produce pleasure, but in fact, desire. While dopamine makes us want, pleasure comes from opioids and endocannabinoids ( a kind of marijuana produced in the brain), which paints pleasure on good experiences.

Potential clinical application

We cannot explain away our minds by brain mechanisms. Brain mechanisms are part of our minds.

Understanding that desire and dread, for instance, share the same brain operations, could help ease schizophrenia symptoms by restricting a particular dopamine neuron that produces fear.

6 more ideas

Wilhelm Rontgen
Wilhelm Rontgen

The German scientist was the first person to identify electromagnetic radiation in a wavelength that we today know as an x-ray.

The most common usage of x-rays includes ...

Early life of Wilhelm Rontgen
  • Röntgen was born on March 26, 1845, in Lennep, Prussia.
  • He enrolled in the Federal Polytechnic Institute in Zurich as a student of mechanical engineering in Switzerland.
  • In 1869, Röntgen obtained a Ph.D. and became an assistant professor.
  • By 1874, he qualified as a Lecturer at Strasbourg University and became a professor in 1876.
  • In 1888, Röntgen moved to become Chair of Physics at the University of Würzburg, where he made his world-changing discovery.
Discovering a new type of ray

On November 8, 1895, Wilhelm Röntgen was conducting experiments using a cathode ray tube. He noticed that when he used the cathode ray tube, a board on the other side of his lab that was covered in phosphorus began to glow. Even if he covered the tube's light in a thick black cardboard box, the phosphorous board continued to glow.

It became clear to Röntgen that he had discovered a new type of ray.

one more idea

Astronomer Mary Somerville (1780 - 1872)
Astronomer Mary Somerville (1780 - 1872)

The Scottish astronomer’s research has proven essential to the discovery of Neptune. Furthermore, in 1835 she got the title of the first female member of the Royal Astronomical Society in London an...

British paleontologist Mary Anning (1799 - 1847)

She made the fascinating discovery of what we call today the Jurassic remains, by finding an ancient reptile at a very young age. 

Even though she did not receive recognition during her lifetime, she now bears the title of the ‘unsung hero of fossil discovery.’

Ada Lovelace - Mathematician (1815 - 1852)

She is most famous for the creation of what is today known as ‘looping’- a method by which the computer programs repeat a series of instructions.

4 more ideas

Creative genius and madness
Creative genius and madness

There are many so-called mad geniuses in history. Suicide victims include Vincent Van Gogh or Ernest Hemingway. Creative geniuses who have succumbed to alcoholism or other addictions are legio...

Cognitive disinhibition

The creative genius tends to pay attention to things that normally should be ignored or filtered out.

People with schizophrenia are bombarded with hallucinations and delusions that should also be filtered out. However, creative genius differs from them in that the genius can separate bizarre fantasies from realistic possibilities. 

Normal and abnormal

Many geniuses walk the line between the normal and the abnormal. The many impulses and ideas they perceive are a fountain of creativity. However, rational thought does impose a limit on a person's concept of his relation to the world.

Lessons from Social Media
  • At the beginning of the decade, we idealistically thought to connect the world would bring people together and help them become more tolerant of their differences. Sadly, the rise of intoleran...
The best time in world history

It is the best time in world history to be alive. We are safer, healthier, less violent, more tolerant, more educated, and more literate than ever. We have more economic freedom, more knowledge, more entertainment, and more connectivity.

But, the overwhelming amount of information and opportunity makes it more difficult to find meaning and purpose. We should learn how to deal with the effects of new technologies and be aware of its limitations.

Corporate overlords

Amazon's logistical efficiency, Apple's global supply chain and other tech companies like Samsung, Facebook, and Google are corporations that are holding the world together more than any international governmental organization.

7 more ideas

The Birth Of The Credit Card
The Birth Of The Credit Card
  • The concept of a multiple-establishment credit card came in the mind of Frank X. McNamara in 1949, when he had forgotten his wallet and was unable to pay for his dinner at a fancy restaurant...
Convenience In The Pocket

The initial card offered by Diners Club didn’t involve revolving credit, and the dues were to be paid off in full by the end of the month. The credit cards that we see now came much later.

Initially targeted at salespeople, the company started charging a $3 annual fee and also charged the establishments 7 per cent for each transaction. The paper-based cards showed tremendous growth in a year, with 20,000 people using it.

Status Symbol

Eventually, the Diners Card became a status symbol and more and more establishments began to trust it. The company printed a list of participating merchants for the help of the members.

Innovative ideas, like associate cards for married women who wanted to shop in the afternoon using their husbands money became popular.

one more idea

Noise Pollution

Many studies link noise pollution to:

  • High blood pressure
  • Sleep loss
  • Heart disease

Just as noise pollution is bad for you, silence can actually benefit you...

New Brain Cells

Giving us another reason to meditate, a study proves that a silent environment helps create new brain cells.

Activation of Memory

Silence helps activate our brain to work better and jog its memory banks efficiently.

one more idea

Infinite desires
Infinite desires

Bertrand Russell, at his Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech, pointed out that all human activity is prompted by desireIf you want to know what man will do, you must know the whole...

Acquisitiveness

Acquisitiveness is the desire to possess as much as possible of goods, or the title of goods

Regardless of how much you acquire, you will always wish for more.

Rivalry

Many men will happily face impoverishment if they can thereby manage to ruin their rivals.


4 more ideas