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Searching for Sasquatch: The Real Story Behind Bigfoot Sightings

Origin of the name Bigfoot

Bigfoot was a common nickname for unusually large, aggressive grizzly bears who ate cattle, sheep and attacked people.

  • In 1958, a California tractor operator found a series of huge muddy footprints.
  • In 1976, naturalist Ivan T. Sanderson published a book where he used footprints, eyewitnesses, and bone samples as potential evidence of "sub-humans" living of five continents, including North America's Sasquatch and the Himalayas' Yeti.
  • In 1982, Sanderson's book was followed by the Patterson-Gimlin film. The film became a phenomenon.

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Searching for Sasquatch: The Real Story Behind Bigfoot Sightings

Searching for Sasquatch: The Real Story Behind Bigfoot Sightings

https://www.popularmechanics.com/adventure/outdoors/a23622082/bigfoot-history/

popularmechanics.com

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Key Ideas

The mythical Bigfoot

For centuries, people have reportedly seen a mythical primate-like animal in the woods of North America. It looks like a strange, large ape-like figure.

This possibly fictitious animal goes by many different names - Bigfoot, Sasquatch, Yowie, Skunk Ape, and Yayali.

Mythical primate-like animals: centuries-old tales

  • In the mythology of the Kwakiutl tribe that used to populate the western coast of British Columbia, Dzunukwa is a big, hairy female who lives in the mountainous forests. She spends most of her time protecting her children and sleeping.
  • In California, there are century-old pictographs drawn by the Yokuts that show a family of giant creatures with long, shaggy hair, called "Mayak datat."
  • Nineteenth- and early 20th-century newspapers had sections devoted to the miners, trappers, gold prospectors, and woodsmen claiming to have seen "wild men," "bear men," and "monkey men."

Origin of the name Bigfoot

Bigfoot was a common nickname for unusually large, aggressive grizzly bears who ate cattle, sheep and attacked people.

  • In 1958, a California tractor operator found a series of huge muddy footprints.
  • In 1976, naturalist Ivan T. Sanderson published a book where he used footprints, eyewitnesses, and bone samples as potential evidence of "sub-humans" living of five continents, including North America's Sasquatch and the Himalayas' Yeti.
  • In 1982, Sanderson's book was followed by the Patterson-Gimlin film. The film became a phenomenon.

Bigfoot and the lack of evidence

Grover Krantz, a professor of physical anthropology at Washington State University also believed in Sasquatch. He was ridiculed for his conviction.

During and after his death, the search for Bigfoot took on a life of its own. More sightings, films, and books emerged. Documentaries captured the public's imagination. However, there is a lack of evidence. Without a body (or skeleton), it's hard to convince others.

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