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Cultural Intelligence: Understand What Shapes Opinions

Being Open-Minded

Cultural Intelligence requires us to be open-minded to alternatives, and not be too attached to our belief systems, assumptions and what all we have learned over the years.

One has to understand that everything is fluid, and it is not necessary that we are always right and the other person is always wrong. We have to be concerned with meaning, not with opinions about who is right.

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Cultural Intelligence: Understand What Shapes Opinions

Cultural Intelligence: Understand What Shapes Opinions

https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/nurturing-cultural-intelligence/202009/cultural-intelligence-understand-what-shapes-opinions

psychologytoday.com

3

Key Ideas

Our Worldview Is Disrupted

Due to the highly unpredictable and uncertain nature of certain events, our opinion about the world has turned largely subjective and detached from reality, because reality itself has become elusive and hard to grasp.

Our mental projections and division of thoughts are creating unique representations about our world which have become our own truth.

How Our Opinions Are Shaped

  • Our belief systems are constructed by our teachers, parents, TV, the internet (mainly social media) and books.
  • Collective thought is considered more powerful than an individual thought.
  • The society is not a singular, objective reality, but a series of different ‘movies’ created inside everyone's head.

Being Open-Minded

Cultural Intelligence requires us to be open-minded to alternatives, and not be too attached to our belief systems, assumptions and what all we have learned over the years.

One has to understand that everything is fluid, and it is not necessary that we are always right and the other person is always wrong. We have to be concerned with meaning, not with opinions about who is right.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

“It is not primarily our physical selves that limit us but rather our mindset about our physical limits.” 

Ellen Langer
Describing the nature of mindsets
  • Mindsets are unique to everyone.
  • Mindsets are created by experiences.
  • Mindsets create blind spots. They provide us with fragmented ways of looking at the world.
  • Mindsets are self-deceptive.
  • Mindsets shape our everyday lives. Changing our lives means shifting our mindsets.
  • Mindsets create our shared world. They are a powerful leverage point for cultural and systemic change.
  • Mindsets can be transcended, using mindfulness.
The three basic mindsets
  • The fixed mindset: Believes strengths are innate gifts that can't be developed.
  • The growth mindset: Believes strengths can be developed with effort.
  • The benefit mindset: Believes in developing strengths and meaningfully contributes to a future of greater possibility.

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Rigid Thinking

The speed of technological and cultural development is requiring us to embrace types of thinking besides the rational, logical style of analysis that tends to be emphasized in our society.

Elastic Thinking

It is the capacity to be flexible, to embrace ambiguity, contradiction, and unconventional mindsets.

It is the ability to abandon our 'marriage' to our beliefs and assumptions, opening ourselves to new paradigms.

Explore The New

Elastic thinking is the way to cutting edge innovation, future visions, science fiction gems, and other great new ideas.

Our tendency to explore and learn has always created something new in the world.

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The argument from incredulity

Is a logical fallacy where someone concludes that since they can’t believe that a certain concept is true, then it must be false and vice versa.

Its 2 basic forms:

I c...

Basic structure of an argument from incredulity

Premise 1: I can’t explain or imagine how proposition X can be true.

Premise 2: if a certain proposition is true, then I must be able to explain or imagine how that can be.

Conclusions: proposition X is false.

It’s ok to be incredulous

... and to bring this up as part of an argument. The issue with doing so occurs when this incredulity isn’t justified or supported by concrete information, and when this lack of belief is used in order to assume that a preferred personal explanation must be the right one, despite the lack of proof.

At the same time, it’s also important to remember that it’s possible that the person using the argument from incredulity is right, despite the fact that their reasoning is flawed.

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Bring People Into Your World

Walt Disney took suspension of reality a step further building theme parks that brought people into his world. You can bring people into your world through storytelling and brand activation.

...

Suspend Reality

Suspending reality is a powerful storytelling technique as it creates a safe, magical world in which to contend with powerful emotions and themes, and it allows the viewer or listener to be transported and associate that escape from reality with the story.

Anything is possible and that becomes inspiration.

Focus on Shared Desires

Disney stories have a near universal appeal because they are designed around struggles and desires that are common to humans everywhere.

You can apply this message to storytelling in your company, too. When you’re communicating with your customers, you should focus on the shared experiences and desires that make your product so valuable.

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Conspiracy Theories
Conspiracy Theories

In the earlier times, conspiracy theories were a convenient way to cover up the inadequacies of the government, and putting a set of helpless people as a scapegoat, cloaking the misdeeds or mismana...

We Love A Good Story

The organic and unpredictable nature of conspiracy theories had led many researchers to investigate the cause of the phenomenon.

  • Successful conspiracy theories always tend to invent a great villain, have a backdrop or a backstory, and a morality lesson that can be easily understood by most.
  • Great stories are by nature more magnetic and appealing than the truth.
  • Human beings think and understand in stories. For thousands of years, fairy tales, legends, anecdotes and mysteries have helped our brains make sense of the world.
Collective Hysteria

Every society has its own, unique anxieties and obsessions, and the conspiracy theories that gain good mileage are the ones that tap into these primal fears.

Example: Many people fear vaccination of the children due to fears that the mass drive to vaccinate such a large population has some ulterior motive, like a mass medical experiment. The dodgy past record of the health care system, and the fact that the vaccination is free of charge, of course, adds fuel to the fire.

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The tiny house appeal
The tiny house appeal

The small spaces are usually less than 500 square feet and often on the wheels of a flatbed trailer. The narrow house tends to have a kitchen, bathroom, and sitting area, and usual...

Tiny houses meet practical needs

The reasons for the popularity of tiny homes are affordability and that they satisfy young people's need for mobility. They can be easily sold or rented.

Whether tiny houses will continue in the future depends on the economy. If the middle class continues to shrink, small homes will likely increase in popularity as people will need affordable housing.

Tiny houses and eco-friendliness

Some of the appealing qualities of living in tiny houses are related to environmental concerns and eco-friendliness. Homeowners of a tiny house feel they are making a positive contribution to the world because it leaves a lighter carbon footprint.

With limited space, it can also be part of living a simpler life with a dramatic downsizing of clothing, housewares, furniture, and other possessions. It is less to clean and maintain and has lower housing payments and utility bills.

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Make Your Enemies Into Allies

Pointing out others’ mistakes rarely encourages them to change their behavior, and it certainly doesn’t help them learn anything. People aren’t driven by reason, but by emotion; so a public ...

Be The Beacon Your People Need

Nelson Mandela was lauded as a courageous leader -- even when he was truly terrified. Like the time he astonished his bodyguard by calmly reading a newspaper while the plane he was flying on had engine failure.

Mandela himself, however, later confessed in private that he’d been truly terrified but refused to show it. Mandela knew that courage is a choice, and everyone can be courageous by learning to cope with your anxieties and fears every day. 

Recruit Remarkable Guides

Niccolò Machiavelli held that using advisors well begins with knowing one’s own weaknesses and selecting advisors to offset them. It’s also necessary to know how to solicit advice the right way.

For Machiavelli, that meant showing advisors he valued their honest opinion and would not punish them for giving it. But, at the end of the day, he was the one calling the shots.

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We don’t ask big questions

Big questions referring to is the meaning of life matter deeply because only with sound answers to them we can direct our energies meaningfully, but most of us get shy expressing them. -...

Philosophy = thinking for yourself

Philosophers are interested in asking whether an idea is logical–rather than simply assuming it must be right because it is popular and long-established. - Alain de Botton

Philosophers were the first therapists

Philosophers teach us to think about our emotions, rather than simply have them. By understanding and analysing our feelings, we learn to see how emotions impact on our behaviour in unexpected, counterintuitive and sometimes dangerous ways.  - Alain de Botton

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Intention vs Action
Intention vs Action

In a world of constant, propaganda, and deceit, what we do matters more than our intentions.

What we actually do tells people about us, not what we keep saying or what we intend to do....

Good Intentions are not sufficient

The physical world is interacting with our actions, not our internal plans and intentions. 

We cannot shape society, or help people just by having noble intentions, without action.

Justifying Wrong Treatment

We treat people in certain ways and then justify the same. You are judged by what you do, and not for the reasons you give.

If our treatment isn't right, no amount of justification will serve any purpose.

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