Brain Handles The Pain Naturally - Deepstash

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What is pain?

Brain Handles The Pain Naturally

When we feel acute pain, we act according to our past experience, preset responses and other environmental and social factors, taking the help of some natural powers of our brain, we can even temporarily block our pain. Pain drives us towards action, prompting a fight or flight response.

Our skin as a whole network of ‘pain nerve fibres’ with nociceptors in the ends which send signals to the spinal cord and to the brain, where the perception of pain along with its intensity is felt by the individual.

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Neuronal Correlates of Consciousness (NCC)

The whole brain can be considered an NCC because it generates experience continually.

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Ignoring The Problem

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