Intellectual humility

Intellectual humility

It means being actively curious about your blind spots. It’s not about lacking confidence, or self-esteem. It’s about entertaining the possibility that you may be wrong and being open to learning from the experience of others.

@iamnina

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Self Improvement

MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

The Dunning-Kruger effect

It's a type of cognitive bias in which people believe that they are smarter and more capable than they really are. Inexperience masquerades as expertise. And we tend to see it in other people, but we don’t see it in ourselves.

Why we need more intellectual humility
  1. Our culture promotes and rewards overconfidence and arrogance; 
  2. At the same time, when we are wrong — out of ignorance or error — and realize it, our culture doesn’t make it easy to admit it. Humbling moments too easily can turn into moments of humiliation.
Our reality will always be an interpretation

Even if we might tell ourselves our experience of the world is the truth. Our interpretations of reality are often arbitrary, but we're still stubborn about them. Light enters our eyes, sound waves enter our ears, chemicals waft into our noses, and it’s up to our brains to make a guess about what it all is. 

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RELATED IDEAS

  1. Do not ridicule them, as it can make them defensive.
  2. Provide examples and gently guide their minds towards the possibility that their belief may not be true.
  3. Being humble, unbiased and objective are important values that can be nurtured in all, especially youngsters.

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IDEAS

Intellectually humble people know more because they are open to new information and more willing to be receptive to other people's perspectives.

Approaching issues with a beginner's mind or intellectual humility can help you become more knowledgeable, less overconfident, and more willing to engage with others.

When you ask yourself better questions, you are forced to think deeply about your tasks and problems and the best way forward.

  • Before a task: Is this similar to a previous task? What do I want to accomplish? What should I do first?
  • During the task: Am I on the right track? What can I improve? Who can I ask for help?
  • After a task: What worked well? What could I have done better? Can I use this for other situations?

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