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Reading with intention can change your life

Our memory is made up of 3 components

...in terms of reading retention:

  • Impression
  • Association
  • Repetition

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This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

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Reading with intention can change your life

Reading with intention can change your life

https://qz.com/658605/reading-with-intention-can-change-your-life/

qz.com

6

Key Ideas

Successful people stick to their reading habit

A random sampling of the world’s most successful people will show one common trait: a love of reading. Because reading is the easiest way to continue the learning process. 

Whatever problem you’re struggling with is probably addressed in some book somewhere written by someone a lot smarter than you."

- Ryan Holiday

Whatever problem you’re struggling with is probably addressed in some book somewhere written by someone a lot smarter than you."

- Ryan Holiday

Our memory is made up of 3 components

...in terms of reading retention:

  • Impression
  • Association
  • Repetition

When you’re impressed by something, you'll remember it easier

This could mean a phrase or quote that catches you off guard or changes the way you think about a certain topic. Or an interesting fact that you’ll want to save for later on.

Most important step for long-term memorization: repetition

Without re-engaging with the material that you’ve read, you’ll not be able to remember and apply any of that knowledge. So you need to have a method for taking and organizing notes around key parts you want to revisit later on.

Reading with intention engages all of the parts of memory

It means that you have a specific goal at hand, you want to connect what you’re reading to other information and that it is something you’re invested in and will come back to again and again.

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Meta-Learning

It's knowing how to learn. Learning itself is a skill, and knowing how to do it well is an incredibly valuable advantage.

Merely acquiring information is not learning....

Learning has 2 phases

Learning is a two-step process:

  • Read/listen: feeding ourselves new information.
  • Process and recall what you’ve just ‘learned’: connecting new materials to what we already knew.
Remembering the right things

You should not waste your time by committing unimportant details to memory. 

Your focus should be on understanding the bigger picture, on how things relate to each other.

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Note-taking: a powerful tool for learning
  • Notes extend your memories: writing can be seen as an external enhancement of your brain, allowing you to think more complicated thoughts and solve harder problems.
  • Not...
How to Take Notes While Reading
  1. Figure out your purpose.
  2. Choose a technique that maximizes your focus on what is most relevant for your purpose. 
  3. Decide whether to optimize for review or retrieval practice.  
  4. If you do need to go back into the text again and again, create clues in your notes that can help you find what you’re looking for faster.
Figure out your purpose

Ask yourself why are you reading:

  • What am I trying to remember? 
  • How am I going to use this information? (e.g. on a test, cited in an essay, etc.)
  • What do I plan to do with the notes later? Will you be studying off of them extensively? Or maybe you’re just taking notes to stay focused, and it’s highly unlikely you’ll look through them after?

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Re-reading doesn't help

Don't just re-read your notes. When you first read, you extract a lot of information, but when you do it the second time, you read with a sense of 'I know this, I know this.'

...

Ask lots of questions

Read once and then quiz yourself. Retrieving that information is what actually produces more robust learning and memory.

Even if you get the answers wrong, you'll still have an idea of what you don't know. This helps guide your studying more effectively.

Make connections

Relate new information to prior information for better learning.

During a second reading, try to connect new information to something you already know.

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