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Déjà Vu: The Science Behind the Eerie Feeling of Familiarity

Our Memory

Déjà vu can be explained in terms of our memory:

  • Single Event Familiarity: When one element is familiar but other elements are not.
Example: When you see a person you vaguely recognize(like your barber) out in the street.


  • Gestalt Familiarity: When the layout and surroundings seem familiar.

Example: A layout of a room is similar to a room you have seen before but some details are not matching.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Déjà Vu: The Science Behind the Eerie Feeling of Familiarity

Déjà Vu: The Science Behind the Eerie Feeling of Familiarity

https://www.thoughtco.com/causes-of-deja-vu-4159448

thoughtco.com

4

Key Ideas

That Familiar Feeling

Déjà vu is French for ‘already seen’. It is a feeling that the situation(or surrounding) is familiar subjectively, but unfamiliar objectively.

Almost two-thirds of individuals have experienced Déjà vu at least once in their lifetime, including blind people.

Déjà vu is a fleeting, intangible experience, making it hard to measure, and is also highly subjective.

Déjà vu

Déjà vu is French for ‘already seen’. It is a feeling that the situation(or surrounding) is familiar subjectively, but unfamiliar objectively.

Almost two-thirds of individuals have experienced Déjà vu at least once in their lifetime, including blind people.

Déjà vu is a fleeting, intangible experience, making it hard to measure, and is also highly subjective.

Our Memory

Déjà vu can be explained in terms of our memory:

  • Single Event Familiarity: When one element is familiar but other elements are not.
Example: When you see a person you vaguely recognize(like your barber) out in the street.


  • Gestalt Familiarity: When the layout and surroundings seem familiar.

Example: A layout of a room is similar to a room you have seen before but some details are not matching.

Our Neurology

Déjà vu can be explained in terms of our neurological activity:


  • Spontaneous Brain Activity: When a part of your brain is engaged with memory, thoughts can overlap, and one can experience a false sense of familiarity. The complex memory structures result in cross-connections.
  • Neural transmission speed: Déjà vu can be felt when the various parts of one’s brain that transmit information get disrupted, or if the information arrives at different times, like a traffic jam in the brain’s highways.

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What to eat

  • Animals (especially a "whole animal" approach, including organs, bone marrow, cartilage, and organs).
  • Animal products (such as eggs or honey).
  • Vegetables and fruits.
  • Raw nuts and seeds.
  • Added fats (like coconut oil, avocado, butter, ghee).

What to avoid

  • Grains, although research suggests eating whole grains improve our health and appear to be neutral when it comes to inflammation.
  • Heavily processed oils, such as canola and soybean oil.
  • Legumes, although research suggests the benefits of legumes outweigh their anti-nutrient content. Cooking eliminates most anti-nutrient effects. Some anti-nutrients may even be good.
  • Dairy.

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The Science of Memory

  1. Encoding - the stage when the brain consciously acknowledges information based on our senses. When we attach meaning or factual knowledge to any of this sensory input, that'...

Lifestyle Changes That Can Improve Memory

  • Get a good night's sleep or take a power nap after learning something new, to help retain and retrieve memories better. Sleep deprivation and acquisition of too much information will not help you save those memories.
  • Get moving, to improve the flow of oxygen-rich blood in your brain and to trigger neuron growth and new connections in the brain - critical for memory.
  • Improve your diet. Fats from food can build up the brain, resulting to poor blood flow.

Mnemonics

Any system or device designed to aid memory:

  • patterns of letters or words (common mnemonics)
  • ideas (memory palace)
  • associations (chunking)

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