Playing with light and colour - Deepstash

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How ‘biophilic’ design can create a better workspace

Playing with light and colour

Phillophilic design is about bringing nature in all its forms, including patterns, materials, shapes, spaces, smells, sights, and sounds, into the urban design on varying scales.

Adding greenery is the most obvious starting point. Other additions are light and colour. Natural light supports the circadian rhythms of the body, which regulate our sleep-wake cycle and hormones. Earth tones can also have an array of positive psychological and physiological effects. However, colours should represent a healthy nature such as forest greens, sky blues, or savannah browns. Look outside and see how you can bring those colours inside.

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