Counteract the Planning Fallacy - Deepstash

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Time management for students: strategies and tips to build your focus

Counteract the Planning Fallacy

When you start to schedule your tasks, you may be too optimistic about how much you can get done. You may take on too much work or get stressed when tasks take longer than you expected.

To counteract the Planning Fallacy:

  • Work in a buffer into your schedule.
  • If the task is familiar, give yourself 1 - 1.5 times you think it will take.
  • If it is new, give yourself double the time you think it will take.

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