The Compounding Effect of News - Deepstash

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Lots of Overnight Tragedies, No Overnight Miracles

The Compounding Effect of News

Heart disease has declined 1.5 percent per year, and if that news is on the internet, it is not likely to go viral. But what is overlooked is the compounding effect, which is invisible in the short run, and only noticeable after 15 to 20 years.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Voltaire

“History never repeats itself. Man always does.”

Voltaire
History lessons
The most important lessons from history are the takeaways that are so broad they can apply to other fields, other historical times, and other people. 

The point is that the more specific a lesson of history is, the less relevant it becomes.

Adopting new views 

One of the interesting parts of the Great Depressions from history is not just how the economy collapsed, but how quickly and dramatically people’s views changed when it did.

People suffering from immediate, unexpected adversity are likely to adopt views they previously thought absurd. It’s not until your life is in full chaos (with your hopes and dreams your dreams unsure) that people begin taking ideas they’d never consider before seriously.

The Reality Behind Supplements

Studies demonstrate that multivitamins don't improve outcomes on a number of health measures, from staving off cognitive decline to preventing cardiovascular disease and cancer. The health b...

Beware Of Supplements’ Claims

In the US, supplements are regulated like food — and not drugs — under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994, pill makers can basically put whatever claims they want on their bottles.

One analysis of supplement websites found 81 percent made at least one health claim — and more than half of those promised to treat, prevent, diagnose, or cure specific diseases. But a quick thought exercise will tell you that if these pills were truly panaceas, the FDA would have to treat them like drugs, not foods.

Resist The Urge For a Quick Fix

Back when undernutrition and vitamin deficiencies were widespread, supplements made some sense. But now one of the more urgent health problems is obesity and overnutrition while a growing body of studies shows that supplements’ effects are minimal or negative. 

Remember that you can’t know for sure what's really in your supplement bottle. And that the pills probably won't make you any healthier (unless you have a medically diagnosed deficiency). And they might even be hurting you.

WWI and women working
WWI and women working

Over a century ago, women in the UK weren't allowed to own property, open a bank account, or work in a legal or civil service job.

When WW1 broke out in 1914, over a million women j...

WWII and the NHS

The National Health Service (NHS) was established in 1948 and is funded from general taxation. Before the NHS, people were expected to pay the hospital or a private doctor if they needed to use medical services.

WWII necessitated government-supported medical services to become freely available for everyone.

More people go to university

Recessions and the lack of jobs that ensues can lead more people to pursue education. This progress also affects subsequent generations.

A more educated workforce tends to make an economy more productive and profitable. The knock-on effects include society's health, lower crime rates, voting, and volunteering.