The meaning of "museum" - Deepstash

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History of Museums - From Oldest to Modern Museums

The meaning of "museum"

  • The word "museum" comes from Ancient Greek "mouseion" which meant "seat of Muses." It was used as a place for contemplation.
  • In Rome, "museum" was a place used for philosophical discussions.
  • In the 15th century, the word "museum" was used to describe the collection of Lorenzo de Medici in Florence.
  • Only in the 17th century was "museum" used to describe collections of curiosities.
  • In 1677, the collection of John Tradescant was moved to the University of Oxford and made available for public viewing. It marks the moment when “museum” starts being an institution and not just collection of items.

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