Our Working Memory

Our Working Memory

The limited amount of load we can take on our working memory, which functions like computer RAM, is called the cognitive load.

Miller's Law states that we need to limit our cognitive loads and hold on to approximately seven number of objects at a given time.

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To increase our learning performance, we need to balance our cognitive load. It helps to understand what the three types of cognitive loads are:

  1. Intrinsic cognitive Load: The inner load we feel when we are calculating something complex. This is a fixed load on the brain.
  2. Extraneous cognitive load: Presenting information or a task in a certain way, like visually or verbally, making it easier to understand.
  3. Germane cognitive load: It is the flow-chart constructions of the brain, which help in long-term learning. The mind makes information easier to grasp by creating maps and inner processes, helping us understand better.
  1. Grouping or chunking of various pieces of information into different sections, making them easier to retrieve and remember.
  2. Making mind maps or process maps, and also thinking in maps making constructive associations and flow-charts.
  3. Clearing your mind by taking your thoughts out of it and projecting it where they are better visualized. This is also known as brain-dumping, and writing is a good way to understand context, build associations and improve memory.
  4. Collaborating with others using brainstorming sessions, Idea-meets, or creating a learning plan together as a team, confluence style.

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Your working memory capacity can be overloaded in three ways, making you feel mentally drained:

  • New routines can prevent you from the ability to do things on auto-pilot and will instead draw on your limited working memory capacity.
  • Anxiety also reduces your working memory capacity, making it more challenging to work through any mental problem that needs problem-solving.
  • Distractions that are not directly relevant to your tasks can further increase the demand on your working memory capacity.

Cognitive Load Theory: Explaining our fight for focus

bbc.com

The working memory

Working memory temporarily stores the information you are working on. But it is not just a simple storage. The working memory enables you to create new thoughts, change them, combine them, search them, or any other function that helps you navigate your life.

By enabling these functions, working memory upholds your thinking, planning, learning, and decision-making.

Working Memory

scotthyoung.com

Procrastination is fundamentally an emotional reaction to what you have to do. The more aversive a task is to you, the more you’ll resist it, and the more likely you are to procrastinate.

Aversive tasks tend to: be boring, frustrating, difficult, lack intrinsic rewards, be ambiguous and unstructured.

Here's why you procrastinate, and 10 tactics that will help you stop

alifeofproductivity.com

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