Marketing And Product Development Taught By A Blockbuster Game - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

What Animal Crossing can teach us about marketing and product development

Marketing And Product Development Taught By A Blockbuster Game

Marketing And Product Development Taught By A Blockbuster Game

Animal Crossing: New Horizons sold 13 million copies in six weeks, making it one of the most popular games of modern times. The universal, de-stressing nature of the game contrasted with what 2020 unleashed at the same time in the month of March.

One of the first marketing lessons that Nintendo, the developer of the runaway hit game provided was that timing is everything.

9 SAVES

92 READS


EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Pokémon
Pokémon

Pokémon, with its first incarnation as a video game + trading card collection, emerged in Japan back in 1996 and created a viral storm, earning USD 5 billion for Nintendo, its pare...

Pokeflu: Nintendo And Game Boy

The Pokémon craze was in full bloom when the first movie of the franchise debuted in 1999, though the parent company Nintendo made huge waves with the innovative, crazy-good NES console in 1983. The games were imaginative and beautiful, becoming extremely popular all across the world.

In 1989, Nintendo’s handheld console, Game Boy, in which many games including Pokémon debuted, changed the way games were consumed both by adults and children.

The Pokémon Phenomenon
  • The game is set in a fictional village where players explore the rivers and forests searching for creatures(or monsters) which are for taming and training.
  • The game was designed to compel the player to seek out other players and network with them to complete their mission.
  • American companies like Atari provided a primitive gaming experience when compared to the explorative, dream-like atmosphere and playing complexity provided by Game Boy.
  • The game was originally considered too cute for American gaming customers, where macho men and femme fatales were preferred to school children and ‘Hello Kitty’ styled monsters.
Steve Jobs' presentation style
  • A "Tweet-friendly headline" that summarises the product you're presenting: e.g.: "iPod: One thousand songs in your pocket."
  • Showing your passion: He acte...
Tweet-friendly headlines

Steve Jobs's intro sentences were so great because they clearly outlined what the product did while creating intrigue.

Rather than rambling on, he used them to perfectly convey his message as compactly as possible.

Examples of one sentence summaries of the product he was presenting: "Mac Book Air: the world's thinnest notebook", and "iPod: One thousand songs in your pocket."

Tailor to the audience

Whether you're networking or presenting, it's important to realize that it should never be a one-sided conversation.

Your audience is in the room for a particular reason. It's critical to understand why they're listening to you so you can tune your presentation in a manner that makes them more receptive listeners,

Read For Immediate Rewards

Studies show that there’s correlation between human behavior change and immediate rewards. Receiving immediate rewards releases dopamine in our brains, which compels us to seek mor...

Use Triggers to Your Advantage

We often start habits and drop them a few days later. To combat this, you can use triggers to remind you to practice the habit. Examples of triggers:

  • Reading at the same time everyday will prime your brain to automatically trigger itself to begin reading.
  • Leaving your books in places you will easily see is another trigger. If you read books digitally you could pin your tab so it’s always in your visual perspective.
Stop Before You’re Finished

Studies indicate that the Zeigarnik Effect is real. It says you are more likely to recall uncompleted tasks than completed ones.

Knowing this pattern of our brains, we can trick it by forcing cliffhangers when we’re reading books. It’s hard to stop reading in the most interesting part but it will make you want to start reading again.