How to stop blaming your partner when things go wrong - Deepstash

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Why Playing the Blame Game in Your Relationship Doesn’t Work - Mindful

How to stop blaming your partner when things go wrong

There are two ways to change this habit:

  1. Keep in mind that what your partner does is not personal (so don't take it that way) and more often than not, things just don't go according to plan.
  2. Instead of pushing blame towards your partner, make it an opportunity to let them take accountability by communicating your raw emotional experience. This sounds like "I felt ...., when you did... ."

The key is to notice this instinct and then shift blame by remembering the steps above.

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