Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviours (BFRBs) - Deepstash

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Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviours (BFRBs)

Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviours (BFRBs)

Humans have anxiety-related behaviours like chewing on nails, or stressing any part of their body, which are repetitive and habitual.

A new study shows that an increase in stress provides a surge in habitual behaviours, as they demand the least cognitive effort.

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MORE IDEAS FROM THE SAME ARTICLE

Improving mental flexibility and reducing the causes of stress and anxiety is the antidote to our unhealthy and repetitive habits and behaviours.

Mindfulness meditation can help us increase our cognitive flexibility, as can physical activity, social interaction and new exp...

Our habit memories are mostly rigid and inflexible, so it can be a challenge when the changing environment and circumstances require a corresponding alteration in behaviour.

If a person is strictly adhering to their personal routines and habits, change can come as a shock, and also lead to...

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