deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

STASHES TO GET YOU STARTED

© Brainstash, Inc

deepstash

Beta

The Mistake Smart People Make: Being In Motion vs. Taking Action

Turning motion into action

  • Set a schedule for your actions: For on–going goals and lifestyle changes, this works approach. Set a schedule for your actions and stick to it.
  • Pick a date to shift you from motion to action: for tjhings that only happen once and that need planning upfront (releasing a new book, launching a new product, taking a big exam etc.)

26 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The Mistake Smart People Make: Being In Motion vs. Taking Action

The Mistake Smart People Make: Being In Motion vs. Taking Action

https://jamesclear.com/taking-action

jamesclear.com

4

Key Ideas

Motion vs. Action

When you’re in motion, you’re planning and strategizing and learning. Those are all good things, but they don’t produce a result. Action, on the other hand, is the type of behavior that will deliver an outcome.

Motion and the illusion of progress

Motion is a form of procrastination. It's easy to be in motion and convince yourself that you're still making moving forward and making progress. You think, “I’ve got conversations going with four potential clients right now. This is good. We’re moving in the right direction.” Or, “I brainstormed some ideas for that book I want to write. This is coming together.”  

Turning motion into action

  • Set a schedule for your actions: For on–going goals and lifestyle changes, this works approach. Set a schedule for your actions and stick to it.
  • Pick a date to shift you from motion to action: for tjhings that only happen once and that need planning upfront (releasing a new book, launching a new product, taking a big exam etc.)

"Never mistake activity for achievement."
—John Wooden

"Never mistake activity for achievement."
—John Wooden

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Believing That Being Wrong Is a Failure

The best way to know what works and what doesn’t, is to fail a few times.

Smart people don’t fear being wrong because they know that being wrong is ultimately an instrument that pushes...

Thinking That Everything Is About You

Many of us obsess over “rejections” and ruminate on what we could have done differently. It’s more productive to realize that every disappointment or poor interaction is not actually about us. 

Successful people realize that every little thing – bad or good – is not a reflection of them or their self-worth.

Being E-Ready Every Minute of the Day

Smart people know that having a fulfilling life means having a life outside of work. And they make time for it. Obsessively checking work email at the dinner table is a good recipe for disaster. 

Set some time where your phone is off, and your attention is on the people right in front of you.

4 more ideas

Burnout of a Nonprofit employee

The burden is slightly different for a nonprofit employee. In addition to an intimidating pile of work on your desk, you face a steady stream of people whose lives often depend on yo...

Burnout Cause #1: The Grind Never Stops

There is no regular downtime when it comes to serving the needy and fundraising to keep a nonprofit organisation running—this never-ending demand means constant deadlines and a steady stream of emergencies.

How to Deal with it.

  • Schedule Time Off. Plan breaks around deadlines, even if it is only part of a day.
  • Prioritise. Focus on what's really important.
  • Take Some Time to Think. Diarise time to do deadline-free work.

Burnout Cause #2: Other People’s Lives Are on the Line

Falling into the trap of feeling guilty about prioritising yourself when so many people depend on you.

How to Deal with it.

  • Find a Community. Try scheduling dinner or a happy hour with your colleagues or finding an outside group of nonprofit workers.
  • Create Redundancy So You Can Really Disconnect. Start keeping your colleagues in the loop about all your projects—even training them to take over for you in a pinch.
  • Leverage Funding. Consider talking to your donors. Plenty of understanding foundations may be willing to schedule funding for employee wellness.

The sabbatical

The concept of the sabbatical has its roots in the Hebrew Bible. Every seven years, a sabbath year (rest) was commanded to give the land rest from agricultural activity.  

Similarly...

Why you should take a sabbatical

One reason is that we take on more work than we can handle. We are too busy.

In spite of being too afraid of falling behind during a time of rest, a sabbatical can have a positive effect.

Your purpose

A sabbatical is a chance to explore ideas related to your work. 

You need a strong reason to take one, especially if you have to sell your boss on the idea.

3 more ideas