Minimalism: Discard What You Don’t Need - Deepstash

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4 Zen Principles That Will Change the Way You Think

Minimalism: Discard What You Don’t Need

  • To get something new in life, we must first identify the stuff that has fulfilled its purpose and discard it with folded hands of gratitude.
  • To calm your inner turmoil, remove the outer things that unconsciously are the reason for your stress.
  • Let go of all your unnecessary material possessions as well as the physical and mental baggage you are carrying.

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