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What To Do When Worry Keeps You Awake

One of the most common difficulties with getting to sleep is people just can’t turn their minds off. According to the American Psychological Association, 43 percent of Americans say stress has caused them to lie awake at night at least once a month. 

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What To Do When Worry Keeps You Awake

What To Do When Worry Keeps You Awake

https://www.mindful.org/what-to-do-when-worry-keeps-you-awake/

mindful.org

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Key Ideas

Encourage positive distractions

Focusing all your attention on how you can’t get to sleep will only make sleep more difficult. Instead, distract yourself with engaging imagery, involving as many as your senses as possible.

For example, close your eyes and picture a nice beach—can you hear the crashing of waves? Feel the sun on your skin? Taste the salt from the sea?

Allow worrisome thoughts

If you’re unable to sleep because you’re fixated on something stressful that’s happening the next day, it’s common to want to push those thoughts from your mind. However, doing so may hurt more than it helps.

Remembering the mundane tasks that follow something stressful, can help you recognize that the panic will pass.

Practice nightly mindfulness

Often when we’re wide awake worrying, we’re focused on something that’s happening in the future. Mindfulness can be a powerful antidote as it directs your attention towards what’s happening in the present: focus on your breathing or focus physical sensations like how warm your bed sheets feel.

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The Enemy of Sleep

Our body will take care of itself if left on its own. It is our mind which is the culprit, running like a motor, inducing low-grade anxiety inside us.

Sleep is not something you have to do, but something which happens naturally to you. If an insomniac forgets that he is an insomniac, he will have a good night's sleep.

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Stress

Stress is a biological response(or a reaction) to external changes and forces beyond one's resources. Signs of stress include a rapid heart rate, shallow breath, and an adrenaline rush.


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  • Exercise daily.
  • Focus your energy on what you can control.
  • Know that your stress response is unique to you.
Anxiety

Anxiety is the culmination of worry and stress. It is a state of body and mind which is stressed and worried for no apparent reason, like a response to a false alarm.

An anxiety disorder is an acute form of anxiety and a serious medical condition.


How to Handle Anxiety:

  • Curb your sugar, alcohol and caffeine consumption.
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  • Distract yourself by listening to music or a little exercise.
Stress, worry and anxiety can be helped by regular exercise, a nutritious diet and an ample amount of sleep.
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    The necessary amount of sleep

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    Polyphasic sleeping

    It's based on the idea that by partitioning your sleep into segments, you can get away with less of it.

    Though it is possible to train oneself to sleep in spurts instead of a single nightly block, it does not seem possible to train oneself to need less sleep per 24-hour cycle.

    Replacing sleep with caffeine

    Caffeine works primarily by blocking the action of a chemical called adenosine, which slows down our neural activity, allowing us to relax, rest, and sleep.

    By interfering with it, caffeine cuts the brake lines of the brain’s alertness system. Eventually, if we don’t allow our body to relax, the buzz turns to anxiety.

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