Paul Graham's disagreement hierarchy

Paul Graham's disagreement hierarchy

  • DH0. Name-calling: the lowest level of argument.
  • DH1. Ad hominem: attackung the person rather than the point they are making.
  • DH2. Responding to tone: The lowest form of responding to writing is disagreeing with the author’s tone. 
  • DH3. Contradiction: you offer an opposing case but very little evidence.
  • DH4. Counterargument: a contradiction with evidence and reasoning.
  • DH5. Refutation:  quote someone back to themselves and pick a hole in that quote to expose a flaw.
  • DH6. Refuting the central point: The most powerful form of disagreement.
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A straw man argument is a misrepresentation of an opinion or viewpoint, designed to be as easy as possible to contradict.

The only purpose is for it to be easy to expose. It’s not an argument you happen to find inconvenient or challenging. It’s one that is logically flawed.

Mastering the art of considerate disagreement means expressing your beliefs without shutting down the discussion or angering the other side.

For this to happen, you have to listen more, be willing to change your perspective on disagreement and learn to better your arguments.

The People We Argue With At Work
  • It is inevitable to disagree with colleagues, bosses and coworkers at work.
  • People deploy varied techniques and styles when they clash with their work colleagues, but there are no guidelines on how we work through the conflict.
  • It also depends on if we are trying to ensure that the relationship isn’t damaged, or just focused on getting the result.
  • It is all about priorities, and being successful in hustling with others can lead to success at the cost of being alienated by others and losses in the long term.

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