The Library of Ashurbanipal - Deepstash

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8 Legendary Ancient Libraries

The Library of Ashurbanipal

The Library of Ashurbanipal
  • In the mid-19th century, archaeologists found the ruins of the world's oldest known library in Nineveh (modern-day Iraq).
  • It dates back to the 7th century B.C and includes 30,000 cuneiform tablets, mostly containing archival documents, religious incantations and scholarly texts.
  • The Assyrian ruler Ashurbanipal compiled much of his library by looting works from Babylonia and other territories he conquered. The majority of its contents are now kept in the British Museum in London.

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