Benefits of note-taking - Deepstash

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Recovering the Lost Art of Note Taking

Benefits of note-taking

  • Taking notes keeps you focused.
  • It triggers critical, constructive thinking.
  • It enables you to stay engaged.
  • It captures in-the-moment insights, questions, and commitments.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Recovering the Lost Art of Note Taking

Recovering the Lost Art of Note Taking

https://michaelhyatt.com/recovering-the-lost-art-of-note-taking/#

michaelhyatt.com

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Key Ideas

Effective notes taking

  • Choose the right tool: digital or paper, whatever works for you;
  • Give your notes structure: this focuses your thinking and simplifies review and retrieval;
  • Record whatever’s important or interesting: questions, key insights, quotes, diagrams, etc.;
  • Use symbols so you can quickly scan your notes later: e.g.: "*" for important/insightful or "?" for things that require further research;
  • Schedule time to review your notes.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Outline/List

Is a linear method of taking notes that proceeds down the page, using indentation or bullets to denote major and minor points.

Pros: it records content relationship in a way tha...

The Sentence Method

The goal is to jot down your thoughts as quickly as possible. Format is kept to a minimum: every new thought is written on a new line. 

Pros: Is like free writing for notes.

Cons: lack organization and notes can be hard to understand.

Works for: meetings or lectures that lack organization; when information is presented very quickly.

SQ3R (Survey, Question, Read, Recite, Review)
  • Skim the material for bolded text, images, summaries, to produce a list of headlines;
  • Each headline is then written in the form of a question;
  • Record your “answers” to the reading questions under each corresponding header;
  • Once you’ve finished reading the text, write a summary of the material from memory—this is the “recite” part of the process. 
  • Finally, review your notes to make sure you’ve completely grasped the concepts.

Works for: dense written material.

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Purpose of taking notes

Note-taking serves one simple purpose: to help you remember information. 

Although we might associate note-taking with school, it's something most of us continue doing for the bul...

Keep your notes simple

Keep them short, but have enough triggers in the keywords to jumpstart your memory when you look at them again:

  • Stick to keywords and very short sentences.
  • Write out your notes in your own words.
  • Find a note-taking style to fit both your needs and the speakers.
  • Write down what matters.
Outdated techniques

Rereading your notes, highlighting them, underlining them, and even summarizing them  - all take a lot of your time.

Better methods include taking breaks and spreading out your studying (known as distributed practice), and taking practice tests (which isn't really applicable outside of school).

Note Taking - Starter Tips

Preparation steps before a note-taking session:

  • Try to get familiar with the topic that is going to be discussed, beforehand. This leads to better understanding.
  • M...
Outline Method

Taking a structured approach to note-taking is the best way. Put the outline notes by choosing four or five key points of the lecture, followed by in-depth sub-points. One way to review is to use the Cornell Method, which divides the note sheet into three sections:

  • Cues: It includes key questions and main points.
  • Notes: Which you write during the class using the outline method. 
  • Summary: Which you can write after class while reviewing.

The Mind Map

The mind map is a visual diagram of abstract concepts.

It works best in subjects like chemistry, history and philosophy, subjects having a neural network like interlocked and complex topics. 

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