"Robots" comes from the Czech word "robota" - Deepstash

Bite‑sized knowledge

to upgrade

your career

Ideas from books, articles & podcasts.

"Robots" comes from the Czech word "robota"

Karel Čapek first thought of calling his artificial people "labors," but was not satisfied and turned to his brother Josef for advice. Josef suggested the Czech word "robota," which referred to a system of forced serf labour.

When Čapek wrote R.U.R., he was known as one of the leading anti-fascist commentators of the 1930s. His writing, ideas, style, and attitude brought him to the attention of the Nazis, who named him "public enemy number two" in Czechoslovakia.

2

STASHED IN:

38

MORE IDEAS FROM THE SAME ARTICLE

  • 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the entry' robot' into the language.
  • In 1920, Czech writer Karel Čapek wrote a play, R.U.R., or Rossum's Universal Robots. R.U.R. refers to the name of a company devoted to making artificial people ...

R.U.R. was first performed in Prague in January 1921 and was such a success that an English-language adaptation was on Broadway in 1922.

By 1923, the play had been translated into thirty languages. By the end of that decade, the Oxford English Dictionary defined "robot" ...

Discover and save more ideas by creating a

FREE

Deepstash account.

Develop a

reading habit

, save

time

and create an amazing

knowledge library

.

GET THE APP:

MORE LIKE THIS

The Origin Of Robots In Pop Culture

  • Robots have been a staple of science fiction movies for decades, and we now have robots of all shapes and sizes in real life.
  • The conceptualization of an entity which is not human and yet displays human-like characteristics along with special traits like perfect memory and work-e...

STASHED IN:

26

Science fiction in the 1700s

Science fiction emerged about 300 years ago when science made great strides. Authors tried to understand their world by imagining a possible future.

Gulliver's Travels is the earliest science fiction. This satirical 1726 travel narrative is consid...

4

STASHED IN:

33

.. was a pseudonymous patient of psychoanalyst Robert Lindner, in his 1954 case studies, in which the patient had a dual life, which he could switch by mental time-travel and travel in an instant to the far off future, in which a life of power, respect and conquest was lived by him. This ...

1

STASHED IN:

43