What makes fireworks so appealing

What makes fireworks so appealing

The reason we like fireworks so much: they scare us.

  • Like lightning, the bright flashes warn us something is about to happen. This activates the amygdala, a little ball of nerves in the brain that detects fear.
  • After the lights have stimulated the anticipation of a threat, the resounding crack of the firework confirms this perception in our brains. In response, our reward centers release a surge of dopamine (the feel-good neurotransmitter).

86 STASHED

1 LIKE

Fireworks scare us—that’s why we love them

popsci.com

MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

Fireworks might be especially mesmerizing to us because of their novelty.

As we watch these magnificent pyrotechnic stars explode, we’re exposed to injections of color we don’t normally see.

62 STASHED

After seeing these light-up shows over and over again, our brains anticipate the bang that comes after the flashes of light. That's unlike a thunderstorm in which we know thunder follows lightning, but when or how loud the next boom will be is out of our control.

This also explains why these celebratory pyrotechnics often terrify dogs. While we know a sound is coming after the firework takes flight, dogs are caught off guard by the sudden, loud noise.

59 STASHED

1 LIKE

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEAS

The northern lights, or aurora borealis

The magnetic fields of the sun distort and twist as the Earth rotates on its axis. When these fields become knotted together, they create sunspots. Usually, these sunspots occur in pairs.

As the temperature on the surface of the sun rises and falls, the sun boils and bubbles. Particles escape from the sun from the sunspot regions on the surface, throwing particles of plasma, known as solar wind, into space. These winds take about 40 hours to reach Earth, causing the magical displays.

183 STASHED

3 LIKES

Aurora Borealis: What Causes the Northern Lights & Where to See Them

space.com

The two spring dates

For people living in the northern hemisphere, spring has two official start dates.

Meteorologists consider 1 March a spring day, according to the seasons formalised in the 1900s. However, the astronomical seasons show spring starting at the vernal equinox, which falls on 20 March.

12 STASHED

Let there be light! Why sunny spring days make us happier and healthier

theguardian.com

A sense of optimism

What you need to maneuver through a world of uncertainty is a sense of optimism—an attitude characterized by hope and confidence in a positive future.

Optimistic attitudes are linked to a number of benefits, including better coping skills, lower stress and anxiety levels, better physical health, healthier relationships, and higher motivation and resilience when pursuing your goals.

75 STASHED

23 LIKES

What is Optimism, and Why You're a Born Optimist

omaritani.com