An objection to "do what you enjoy" - Deepstash

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Is the secret of productivity really just doing what you enjoy? | Oliver Burkeman

An objection to "do what you enjoy"

One big fear we have is that when we let ourselves do what we enjoy, we'd waste even more hours each day on social media, instead of doing important things.

But we know that when we start a session of challenging work, we often need to give ourselves a push. After that, it's the enjoyment that'll sustain our motivation, not productivity hacks.

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