Less is more - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Scaling down: on seeking fewer goals, relationships, and experiences

Less is more

Many areas in our lives could benefit from scaling down.

  • Meaningful relationships. Research suggests that satisfying friendships that are reciprocal have a positive impact on our well-being.
  • Meaningful experiences. We spend too much time doing, and don't leave space of being. Instead of attending every event, plan a big adventure for yourself. Instead of eating out every evening, save up for the best restaurant.
  • Other areas. Scale down your consumption by buying less. Scale down your time spent at work so you can see your children grow up.

9 SAVES

38 READS


EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon
Tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon

The tip-of-the-tongue, or lethologica, is a common phenomenon where memories seem to be momentarily inaccessible.

Bilingual people seem to experience more tip-of-the-tongue...

How to manage the tip-of-the-tongue state

Next time you experience a tip-of-the-tongue state, don't retrieve the information from memory. Instead, look up the correct answer. Repeat it a few times or write it down to help with encoding.

People that experience the tip-of-the-tongue state often suffer from incorrect practice time. Instead of learning the correct work, they are learning the mistake itself. For example, some music students who claim to practice diligently can get worse over time. This is because they keep on repeating the same mistakes, instead of using deliberate practice. They actually train themselves to make mistakes.

Learning to worry well

Worry is generally seen as a negative thing. But it could also have a positive function.

Worry is an adaptive function to better solve problems and imagine creative...

Worry and imagination

Worry is actually a product of imagination. If we didn’t have an imagination, we wouldn’t worry.

Worry and imagination are built on remembering things from the past and projecting ourselves into the future.

Worry, anxiety, and stress
  • Worry. A repetitive form of thinking about the future or the past.
  • Anxiety. An uncomfortable feeling of fear, apprehension, or dread, often in the gut or chest, accompanied by physical symptoms such as rapid heartbeat and sweating.
  • Stress. A physical response (fight or flight) to a threat, real or imagined. It’s characterised by an adrenaline and cortisol surge, and increased blood levels to your muscles.
Our values
Our values

Our values are our preferences about what we consider appropriate courses of actions.

They strongly influence our decisions. Therefore we should take the time to consider w...

The transmission of values

Personal values can be ethical, moral, ideological, social, or even aesthetic. Values are mostly transmitted through parenting, but our cultural environment also plays a role.

For instance, American parents tend to value intellectual knowledge; Swedish parents value security and happiness; and Dutch parents value independence and the ability to stick to a schedule.

The four personal value orientations

There are four different personal value orientations based on our "terminal values " - our desirable states of existence, and "instrumental values" - the means by which we achieve our end goals.

  1. Personal-competence. "I value wisdom (terminal), which I believe can be achieved through independent thinking (instrumental)."
  2. Personal-moral: "I valued true friendship (terminal), which I believe can be achieved through honesty (instrumental)."
  3. Social-competence: "I valued equality (terminal), which I think can be achieved through ambitious work (instrumental)."
  4. Social-moral: "I value national security (terminal), which I believe can be achieved through obedience (instrumental)."