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The Overthinker’s Guide to Taking Action

Moving from thinking to doing

Moving from thinking to doing

It's easier to spend time picturing our goal or what a project is going to be like than to actually do the project. We tend to value the thinking mindset more than the doing mindset.

Results come to those who act. Just being willing to sit down and apply yourself, however tiny, will give you greater returns.

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Results come to those who act upon their plans, not to those that spend most of their time seeking the right way to do it.

When it comes to goals, projects, and other to-do items, it’s easy to get stuck too long in the thinking and planning phase. And unfortunately, most of them will never be done.

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This requires a lot of discipline, commitment and risk-taking, but it's the only way to make progress.

If you are not daring and focused enough, you can never get past the “thinking” stage of getting work done.

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“An overnight success is ten years in the making.”
There are no “overnight successes”

There are no quick hacks that bring faster results.

Every incredibly successful person you know today has been through the boring, mundane, time-tested process that eventually brings success. 

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The more you work, the less it feels like a grind

Procrastinators severely overestimate how hard it is to finish a task.

While it can be very tough to start, you'll gain momentum and achieve ten times more work with the same willpower. The result will also be much more rewarding.

The optimistic procrastinator

You overestimate your skills and underestimate the challenge. Your goals may be too small, or you didn't break the big goals into daily tasks.

What you find yourself doing: You don't write a deadline on your calendar, but promise to start tomorrow. You may even tell everyone how easy it is or what you plan to do.

Solution: Commit to a deadline, or make it a challenge to get done as much as possible.