The First-Night Effect: The Reason We Can’t Sleep At A New Place

The First-Night Effect: The Reason We Can’t Sleep At A New Place
  • Known as the First-Night Effect, many of us aren’t able to sleep properly at a new place the first time.
  • The reason for this, according to research, is that half our brain (the left hemisphere, mostly) stays awake in alert mode. This area of the brain is called the default-mode network and is responsible for being active while we daydream or wander in our thoughts.
  • The unfamiliarity of the new place, and the many unknowns in the area surrounding us, makes the brain stay half-awake, resulting in poor sleep.
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