deepstash

Beta

The 5 Core Skills Of Hostage Negotiators

Control In Crisis Negotiations

People in crisis often feel they lack control. By letting them talk and being a part of the negotiation process you give them a sense of control, helping them de-escalate and bringing yourself closer to your goal; voluntary compliance.

You also have to keep control of yourself, especially your emotions, as negative displays of emotion by you can escalate the situation. 

81 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The 5 Core Skills Of Hostage Negotiators

The 5 Core Skills Of Hostage Negotiators

https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/beyond-words/201510/the-5-core-skills-hostage-negotiators

psychologytoday.com

8

Key Ideas

“In crisis situations, emotions can dictate a person’s actions at the detriment of rational thinking.”

“In crisis situations, emotions can dictate a person’s actions at the detriment of rational thinking.”

"We all need to be good listeners and learn to demonstrate our empathy and understanding of the problems, needs, and issues of others. Only then can we hope to influence their behavior in a positive way.”

"We all need to be good listeners and learn to demonstrate our empathy and understanding of the problems, needs, and issues of others. Only then can we hope to influence their behavior in a positive way.”

The Goal In Law Enforcement Hostage Crisis Situations

To use communication skills to get a person to change from a negative behavior to a more desirable one.

A Negotiator's Goals During Crisis Management

In crisis situations a person’s actions is heavily based on emotions, at the expense of rationality. A negotiator seeks to reduce the negative emotions and bring back a more rational thinking process through the use of active listening, timing, empathy, rapport building, influence and control.

Core Skill 1: Active Listening

By strategically using open-ended questions, emotional labeling, mirroring/reflecting, silence, and paraphrasing, active listening allows the negotiator to gather information on the other person and simultaneously demonstrate empathy and rapport, thus reducing their negative emotions.

Core Skills 2 & 3: Empathy and Rapport

To influence someone it's necessary to show an understanding of their current emotions and behaviors; to have empathy. This can be done by attentively listening.
Building rapport involves giving the person your attention, being positive and ensuring verbal and nonverbal communication are congruent.

Control In Crisis Negotiations

People in crisis often feel they lack control. By letting them talk and being a part of the negotiation process you give them a sense of control, helping them de-escalate and bringing yourself closer to your goal; voluntary compliance.

You also have to keep control of yourself, especially your emotions, as negative displays of emotion by you can escalate the situation. 

Influence In Crisis Negotiations

After using the other crisis negotiations skills you can pursue the final goal, to nudge someone else’s frame of mind towards a positive outcome.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Types of Negotiators
  • Integrative negotiators: create value between negotiating counterparts.
  • Distributive negotiators: maximize their claim to value in the negotiation at hand.
  • Cr...
Police Negotiation Techniques

They aim to reconcile a counterpart’s problems with the need to maintain the peace for society at large.

Using active-listening techniques, maintaining an open-minded approach, and building rapport to influence one’s counterpart are some of the skills used to resolve conflict and this skills can also be used on other kinds of negotiation.

7 Essential Crisis Negotiation Skills Of a NYPD Negotiator
  • Communication: Opening communication avenues to your counterpart signals you are ready to listen and builds rapport between you.
  • Patience: Allowing your counterpart to air concerns and not jumping to conclusions or rushing towards a resolution also builds rapport.
  • Active Listening: An affective skill that helps to maintain an open dialogue and build trust between counterparts also doubling as information gathering.
  • Respect: Makes your counterpart feel understood and that their concerns are being heard and addressed.
  • Calm: its display helps the counterpart feel there is an alternative way to taking harsh measures.
  • Self-Awareness: It's establishing a relationship with the counterpart while keeping communications strategic and purposeful.
  • Adaptability: Is to adapt and respond to changing circumstances in a way that further negotiation goals.
5 Steps for Effective Crisis Negotiation
  • Prepare for crisis: Good crisis-management plans predict and set mechanisms to deal with and minimize the effects of disputes.
  • Establish ground...
Characteristics of Crisis Negotiation
  • High stakes, including communication towards conflict resolution.
  • Unpredictable.
  • Heightened negative emotions, often leading to conflict escalation.
  • Multiple parties and teams are involved.
Conversational Narcissism

Is to seek to hold the attention of a conversation on oneself. It occasionally manifests on the average person when we pretend to be listening, but we were really focusing on what we wa...

Active Listening

Is to not judge or analyze what the person is saying at first. Just focusing on listening and trying to understand their perspective.

The Three Components of Active Listening
  1. Paraphrase: Consists of repeating at the speakers a summary of what they say, so they feel understood.
  2. Inquire: Obtain all the information that is relevant to the resolution of the issue.
  3. Acknowledge: Once the issue is made clear, communicate to your counterpart that you understand it.

2 more ideas