“Any education environment that only emphasizes one form of knowledge... - Deepstash

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bloom's taxonomy

Dr. John Medina

“Any education environment that only emphasizes one form of knowledge or the other [tacit or explicit] is failing the human brain."

Dr. John Medina

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

bloom's taxonomy

bloom's taxonomy

https://georgecouros.ca/blog/archives/tag/blooms-taxonomy

georgecouros.ca

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Key Ideas

Content vs. Process

A lot of people feel that learning "content" in schools is not as valuable as it once was, they often refer to the "doctor analogy" 

"I want to know that my doctor did really well in school and thoroughly understand the practice of medicine.."

People would be rest assured knowing that their doctor knows how the process works than know what the process is.

Tacit Knowledge ≠ Explicit Knowledge

Tacit Knowledge is defined as the "know how" (process)  rather than "know what" (content). A part of it could be codified into explicit knowledge. However, it is often difficult to explain just by writing it down. It is something you learn by doing.

Explicit Knowledge, on the other hand, refers to information we see on the books or the internet.

Although there's a difference, one is not dependable without the other

Building Trust While Learning

A shift to focusing on more process in our classrooms will inevitably have some risk, that is why it is essential that we create an environment that builds trust.

Trust is necessary because of the unavoidable fumbling that occurs as we try to express and share tacit knowledge. Without it, we may lack respect for the other needed to stay with them as they fumble.

Content + Process = Success

We have to realize that content and process binds each other. For us to be successful, we need to have knowledge, but more importantly, know how to put it to work.

And even though "knowledge" is at the lowest end of Bloom's Taxonomy, it is still an essential component of how we start learning and realizing things.

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The Inner Game
The Inner Game

The phenomenon of winning or losing something in your mind before you win or lose it in reality is called "The Inner Game."

This is the subject of t...

Self 1 and Self 2

When we are learning something new, we often internally talk to ourselves. Self 1 is the conscious self. Self 2 the subconscious. The two are always in dialogue.

If both selves can communicate in harmony, everything goes well.
But more often,  Self 1 gets judgmental and critical, trying to instruct Self 2. The trick is to calm Self 1 and let Self 2 follow that natural learning process.
Stop trying so hard

There is a time for instruction and putting in the effort. But trying too hard may produce negative results.

Instead, step back and take in less feedback. On a deeper level, we know what to do. We just need to overcome the habit of the mind getting in the way.

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Learning and practice

Acquiring information is not learning.

Although textooks can help, they only work when combined with practice.

The Research Phase
  1. Get the big picture. Scan articles etc. to get an idea of what the field is about.
  2. Determine scope. Limit the size of what you want to learn. “Physics” or “philosophy” is too wide and will take decades. “Classical mechanics”, while still wide, might be a bit easier.
  3. Define success. Make a clear goal for your learning.
  4. Find resources 
  5. Create a learning plan from what you have learned in you previous steps.
  6. Filter resources. Narrow down your resource list (Step 4) to the most important essentials.
The Learning Phase
  1. Learn enough to get started.
  2. Playing around with the information will give context and tacit knowledge to go back and do more verbal, analytic learning.
  3. Learn enough to do something useful with it.
  4. Teach. It is the only way to know for sure that you’ve learned something and a great way to fill in the gaps in your learning.

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Stop

Have the courage to stop what you're doing. Give yourself the space to slow down, so you can see the bigger picture and get a handle on things. 

Take a day or two to rest, do...

Let go of some things

Lin Yutang said, "besides the noble art of getting things done, there is the noble art of leaving things undone. The wisdom of life consists in the elimination of nonessentials." 

What don't you need to do? What can you delegate or let go of?

Commit to less

Having too much to do often has to do with unrealistic goal setting and over-committing your time and energy. 

Are you being overly ambitious? What you can really do?

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