Context Switching

Context Switching

Most of us like to multitask thinking that it is keeping us working efficiently, however, many studies are believing the contrary.

Context switching is a factor that keeps us from performing at our best. When given multiple projects, staying in the zone is harder than one thinks. If you're always switching you'll always miss a lot of effortless productivity.

Theodore H. (@theodorexh) - Profile Photo

@theodorexh

Time Management

MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

  • The statement "I just don't have enough time" is an explicable untruth.
  • Time-blocking can help with handling your time in an efficient manner.
  • This will aid you in being more specific and focused on your workload while needing less time to achieve the same results.
  • Write down in a list all the tasks you can think of that's been provided to you
  • Group the tasks together and sort them out from most urgent down to the ones with a flexible deadline
  • For the tasks that are not-so-important, either you delegate them to someone else or you postpone them
  • Delete distractions and make it a priority to delete them
  • Afterwards, finish the task that takes the least amount of time to do and move forward from there.

Procrastinating is frustrating. To lessen this try this method and see if it works out for you:

  • List down all the things you have to do (just like in brain dumping except you expand on the tiny tasks)
  • Group the tasks together in the same place, platform, or pattern
  • Schedule your time. How much time is there left before you should submit it? Keep in mind that the longer it takes you to finish your tasks, the more work you will be accumulating
  • Time-block and get the job done in one sitting.
  • Detailed checklists are especially helpful when tackling complex projects. Here you can be as meticulous as you can be.
  • It's a system that gets things done without thinking too much and this system works even if you delegate it to someone else, you'll be able to receive the same results in the most likely manner.
  • Think of it as an exceptionally detailed flow chart.
  • Having a checklist allows you to save and load the context you want in less time while also preventing procrastination.
  • Assign a context or a theme for every day of the week so that you can add variety to your weekdays.
  • Create a list of the tasks that you have to perform and group them into different days that fits your needs.
  • Keeping your workdays deep together is not a problem at all as long as it works for you.

Spending too much time on planning and editing is not an ideal way to work. As much as possible we want to be efficient with our time so that we won't lose the momentum of focus.

Here's how:

  • Gather enough information to initiate the project and work until you finish about half of the project.
  • Ask for feedback based off on the 50% finished draft.
  • Work on the revisions based on the feedback that has been provided.

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RELATED IDEAS

In The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains , Nicholas Carr explains how our brain, through neuroplasticity, adapts in response to changes in our environment, like technology innovations, which means we gain and lose certain skills. Social media, email, and team communications tools stimulate our very human desire to want to connect with people and access novel information but diminish the focus and processing skills that our literacy culture of books and newspapers built up. As Carr writes :

“[E]ach interruption brings us a valuable piece of information… And so we ask the Internet to keep interrupting us, in ever more and different ways. We willingly accept the loss of concentration and focus, the division of our attention and the fragmentation of our thoughts, in return for the wealth of compelling or at least diverting information we receive.”

4

IDEAS

The real problem according to experts, is making the switch between managing and making, due to the fact that our brain does not immediately obey us and is stuck on the work that was happening earlier, something known as attention residue.

We can take the help of certain rituals and routines that can help us switch between the two modes, like taking a walk, a few minutes of deep breathing, a short burst of exercise or even a slow cup of coffee.

Personal Kanban

Time commitment to get started: Low

Type: Visual, Tactile

Perfect for people who: Have a tendency to start a lot of projects but finish very few of them.

What it does: Helps you visualize progress on all of your projects.


Using whatever medium you prefer (sticky notes or a whiteboard work well), split your projects into three categories: To Do, Doing, and Done. That’s it.

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