The Science Of Cute

The Science Of Cute

Traits such as big eyes, fuzziness, and having pudgy bodies, we tend to often find them cute and adorable. From babies to baby animals, it's hard not to be excited when we see them; this is only natural due to how our bodies are programmed.

Our brains are filled with "feel-good chemicals" whenever we see something cute. We often find ourselves in gigil. This is also known as cuteness aggression.

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The Puppy Dog Eyes

Most of us are aware of this cute tactic pulled by certain animals but more likely with dogs. As wolves evolved to become domesticated to they developed an irresistible look pulled with their sweet beady little eyes.

Scientists that studied the behavior of dogs in shelters believe that dogs have developed this to exploit human preferences in order for them to find a new home.

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As babies grow older, they start to incorporate other behaviours, such as hugging and gifting, that help to create a bond between themselves and potential caregivers.

The cute looks may draw them in, but their social actions keep others interested. These are the behaviours that convince Mando to care, protect, and make Baby Yoda part of their tribe.

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The Superhuman Power Of The Brain

A simple look at our brain, we would see a blob of jiggly meat, however, this blob of jiggly meat is extremely powerful. Through years of evolution, our brains are responsible for conjuring our pasts and predicting our futures, control our bodies, and create our experiences in the past and the present.

It can also modify our physical reality through a social reality where we can make up something out of nothing and convince other people to treat it as real.

Dogs And Humans
  • Science journal has a new study on the DNA of ancient dogs and humans, which examines the beautiful relationship and shared history of dogs with our species.
  • The oldest remains of dogs were found in Germany and date about 15000-16000 years back.
  • The new analysis asserts that just when the Ice Age ended, about 11000 years back we had five specific lineages of dogs, developing further into a larger number of families.

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