Earliest Evidence of Plate Tectonics

The earliest evidence of the tectonic plates was found in Greenland which was estimated to be abbout 3.8 billion years old. Covnersely, researchers have found that the tectonic plates have been active for as long as 4 billion years ago.

There have been two supercontinents: The Rodinia which happened a billion years ago while the most recent one The Pangea formed about 300 million years ago.

Kieron L (@kieronl) - Profile Photo

@kieronl

🌻

Self Improvement

MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

Facts About Plate Tectonics
  • The theory that states that the Earth's "outer shell" is split into huge slabs of rock we call "plates," glide over the Earth's mantle is known as the Plate Tectonics
  • Alfred Wegener proposed this theory back in 1915 when it was still named the continental drift
  • Before plate tectonics, the continental drift theory was used to explain the geologic features of a region, which eventually became the unifying theory of geology.

There are seven major plates that currently exist:

  1. North American
  2. Pacific
  3. Eurasian
  4. African
  5. Indo-Australian
  6. South American
  7. Antarctic

Although, evidence has been found that the Indo-Australian plate has cracked therefore making the total existing plates to 8.

  • Like a pot boiling on a stove, the driving force behind plate tectonics is the convection in the mantle where the hot material near the Earth's core rises while the colder materials sink.
  • The geologists see it differently though. They believe it's more of a "repeated collision" and call it plate boundaries. The three types of plate boundaries are: Convergent, Divergent, Transform.
  • These tectonic plates move at a rate of 1-2 inches per year.

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEAS

Craters On The Moon
  • The 17th century saw Galilieo exploring the moon using his telescope, wondering how craters were formed.
  • Two centuries later, astronomers like Franz von Gruithuisen proposed that asteroids were responsible for the same, a theory that was rejected.
  • The perfect circular shape of the moon’s craters misled scientists into believing these are mountains. Later the Russian astronomer Nikolai Morozov concluded through a series of experiments that the craters were indeed formed by asteroids.

How to Survive a Killer Asteroid

wired.com

National Geographic recognizes 5 oceans

Since National Geographic began making maps in 1915, it has recognized four oceans: the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Arctic Oceans. Starting on the World Oceans Day 2021 (June 8) it has also recognized the Southern Ocean as the world’s fifth ocean. 

It has long been recognized by scientists, but the lack of an international agreement kept the editors from formally adding it to the list.

There’s a new ocean now—can you name all 5?

nationalgeographic.com

About Volcanoes
  • Most volcanoes are formed when the boundaries of our planet's tectonic plates collide and overlap, eventually sinking deep inside.
  • Many get life by ‘hotspot volcanism’ which is the magmatic activity at the center of the tectonic plate.
  • Volcanoes have created the foundation of the land on our planet, crafting mountains, craters, soil beds and eventually making up to 80 percent of our surface.
  • About 1500 of them are active as of 2018.

Volcanoes, explained

nationalgeographic.com

❤️ Brainstash Inc.